Lesser Spotted Eagles in Poland - 2016/17

Aquila pomarina and A. clanga nests in other countries
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bielikoholik
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Re: Lesser Spotted Eagles in Poland - 2016/17

Post by bielikoholik » September 2nd, 2017, 9:54 pm

Biker, thank you :-)
This season was very short, but a lot happened!

Wojtek
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Post by Wojtek » September 2nd, 2017, 11:31 pm

Thank you Marfo for suggesting the Picr website for generating file codes. This software is so easy to use! Thanks again.
Here is the UwB male (yellow eyes!) looking at the eaglet which was perched on the top of the camera.
Image

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Marfo
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Post by Marfo » September 3rd, 2017, 11:30 am

You're welcome, Wojtek, I'm glad it works for you.
Great picture of the male! I don't believe I have seen him before.

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Jujani
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Post by Jujani » September 3rd, 2017, 6:54 pm

A beautiful abstract of these beautiful eagles.
:thumbs:
A great picture Wojtek, I have always seen the father very briefly.

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Post by Wojtek » September 23rd, 2017, 12:07 am

Well, all lesser spotted eagles are gone to Africa, so it's time to turn my attention to bald eagles. I monitor a small population of 18 pairs at Jordan Lake in North Carolina. The earliest pairs will lay eggs in December and egg laying will last until mid February. It's September and some pairs already started repairing nests, like this pair from New Hope Overlook territory (I didn't take this picture): Image

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Jujani
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Post by Jujani » September 23rd, 2017, 10:48 pm

:wave: Wojtek
Yes, they are already on their way. I hope the young LSE does not fly across the Mediterranean. If you want to, you can follow the route of LSE`s. it is indeed LSE`s from Germany, but the route is shown only from the Polish border. I think the Polish LSE's take the same route. If the young LSEs do not meet the birds they fly with, they often take the route across the Mediterranean Sea and drown miserably.

Route
http://www.nabu.de/tiere-und-pflanzen/a ... 16208.html

The American bald eagle is also very nice to watch and breed, if the nests in Europa are empty here.
I look here in florida to "Romeo and Juliet"
http://www.nefleaglecam.org/
Image

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Post by Wojtek » September 25th, 2017, 5:33 am

Hey Jujani,
Thank you for the interesting map with migration routes of German LSE’s. The female, Petra, must be an experienced eagle, judging from her very efficient flight path to Egypt. The four males are not in a rush to leave Europe, and their ages are not known.
The young LSE’s who perished in Mediterranean were second-hatched eaglets from Latvia. They were removed from nests soon after hatching, reared in captivity and transported to Germany where they were released by hacking. Now, if you look at the map of Europe, to get to Bosphorus fledglings LSE’s from Latvia have to fly south. They don’t know what is ahead of their journey; they may not follow their mom or dad, all they know that they have to go south because that is in their genes. They may join other LSE’s and other raptors once they get to Bosphorus, but before that they are mostly on their own. So, what happened when young eagles from Latvia were released in Germany, several hundred kilometers west of their birth place, they flew straight south and we know what happened next.

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Jujani
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Post by Jujani » September 25th, 2017, 4:15 pm

Here are some data about the LSE, but the info is not current. Until 2015

Petra:
This female was changed in 2013 and lives near a planned wind park. Peggy had bruises in 2013, 2014 and 2015. Again and again the female visits the terrain of the planned wind park.

Peter
This ad. Males have been telemetrized for several years. In 2014, a few days after his female Anna (94758), who had been breeding with him for several years. Anna, however, had set off two days before his arrival and brooded successfully at a different breeding ground.

Rainer
This ad. Males have been telemetrized for several years. In 2014, a few days after his female Anna (94758), who had been breeding with him for several years. Anna, however, had set off two days before his arrival and brooded successfully at a different breeding ground.

Dieter
This male has been telemetrically examined for many years. In many years the eagle had bred. It is due to the fact that he arrives late in the spring and always takes off as the last eagle, but in 2015 it is slightly earlier than in the other years. Information on the brute success of this eagle is not yet available by the Horstbetreuer.

Felixperhaps a Female
This bird was changed 2010 as a nestling and is telemetriert since then. This is the second longest known telemetry period of a crawler from the nestling stage. Even this year, the animal did not yet breed, but constantly visits other breeders in a wide range. This is typical for some ad. Female. It remains exciting whether, when and where the eagle will one day settle. Probably the animal must get a new name, since it is obviously a female. Males already occupy a solid area two years before the first breeding.

https://satellite-telemetry.jimdo.com/

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Post by Mamicja » September 29th, 2017, 8:59 pm

:hi:
The camera is back online. Pity that so late.
Image

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Post by Wojtek » October 5th, 2017, 12:56 am

That’s encouraging!

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