How do you say - - ?

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Jo UK
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How do you say - - ?

Post by Jo UK » November 2nd, 2008, 12:18 am

How do you say Thank you in Estonian?

Martin

Post by Martin » November 2nd, 2008, 12:19 am

Thank you = aitäh or tänan

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Post by visitor » November 3rd, 2008, 10:02 pm

I have a question too - how to say "chicks of Padis" - is it "Padis's chicks" or "Padis' chicks" or something else?
And what if something belongs to chicks? Is it "chicks' thing" or "chicks's thing"? :?
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Post by Jo UK » November 4th, 2008, 1:06 am

If this question is about the possessive apostrophe, I hope I can get it right!

Padis's chicks (Padis, his chicks, is the long, antiquated form)
Just to confuse us more, it is just as acceptable, recently, to write Padis' chicks, or Urmas' posts. I think a lot depends on when and where we went to school.!

The second part of the question is about singular and plural form

So one chick's feathers and
All chicks' feathers -

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Post by Olga » November 29th, 2008, 6:51 pm

The Multilingual Birdsearch Engine
http://www.knutas.com/birdsearch/
here we can translate the names of birds in different languages - sorry, there were no translation for Russian names in this search engine.
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Post by Liis » December 27th, 2008, 12:47 pm

Humble apologies to the Grand Old Lady of white-tailed eagles http://www.looduskalender.ee/en/node/2293, mother of the Jõgevamaa visitor
Well, not Old Hag. But then, what?
Please, suggestions before she comes to haunt me!
Offhand there are at least 4 Estonian old-woman words: memm (sweetish old thing), vanaeit (not polite but not too bad), vanamoor (slightly more witchy), vanamutt (not nice, bit scary too probably)
And just the hag in English.
Jo and you all English /Americans / ... – what do you do with your old ladies so you don’t even have to speak of them? Surely the Vikings took the Ättestupa back with them?

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Post by Jo UK » December 27th, 2008, 5:19 pm

How about Matriarch?

Or she could be a grandmother.
I think I prefer matriarch - it removes any insistence on direct family relationship, but still says she is the female boss!

Or, you could be rather Francophile and call her the Grande Dame.

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Post by NancyM » December 27th, 2008, 10:43 pm

First, thank you for doing these translations ~ it is wonderful to be able to read the articles :bow:

I agree with Jo - Matriarch is a good choice for a "Grand Old Lady"

but:
"Urmas wrote about this eagle, affectionately known as ”Old Hag”, "Vanamutt", in Looduskalender this summer."

"Matriarch" is not an affectionate term. Perhaps you can just use the Estonian word and not try to translate it. Sometimes the concepts do not translate very well. The term "old lady" sometimes carries a different meaning among the younger set (at least, it used to...).

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Post by Liis » December 28th, 2008, 11:37 am

The Matriarch / Gran / ...
Thanks for input!
At least now the lady has been sincerely apologised to, with New Year coming & all.
Does anyone remember or even have Urmas's notice in Looduskalender about her from the summer, and was it translated? There is a newspaper bit - Eesti Päevaleht, July 2007, Estonian only, http://www.epl.ee/artikkel/392291 (thank you, Urmas): she moved house quite late in life, and even got a new mate.
And she is Vanaeit in the headline ... some slight censoring?

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Post by Jo UK » December 28th, 2008, 12:01 pm

Censoring?
Or a change of heart?! :laugh:

With any luck, Urmas will see your question and respond.

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Post by Urmas » December 28th, 2008, 2:39 pm

Dear Ladies,
I agree with Matriarch! The female eagles are really matriachs, bigger and more powerful as males, also protecting offspring etc.
Don't know, how about strategical decisions, but as much as I have observed near nest - building of nest is guided by females...

Estonian language seems to be rich in different words for "older lady". "Vanamutt" is not mine term, it appeared in Rennos text, though I tried to repair.
"Vanaeit" is a word of journalist, who wrote article in Päevaleht (2007 July). He asked first and i was agree with that, as "vanaeit" is usually written for example in fairy-tales, not having bad (and also good) meaning.
In the LK that article was also in 2007, and i can't find it in the server anymore.
U

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Post by Jo UK » December 28th, 2008, 9:02 pm

Liis wrote:Humble apologies to the Grand Old Lady of white-tailed eagles http://www.looduskalender.ee/en/node/2293, mother of the Jõgevamaa visitor
Well, not Old Hag. But then, what?
Please, suggestions before she comes to haunt me!
Offhand there are at least 4 Estonian old-woman words: memm (sweetish old thing), vanaeit (not polite but not too bad), vanamoor (slightly more witchy), vanamutt (not nice, bit scary too probably)
And just the hag in English.
Jo and you all English /Americans / ... – what do you do with your old ladies so you don’t even have to speak of them? Surely the Vikings took the Ättestupa back with them?
Liis - now I have to ask you, who or what is Ättestupa?
I can't find it, yet.

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Post by NancyM » December 28th, 2008, 10:31 pm

Jo UK wrote:Liis - now I have to ask you, who or what is Ättestupa?
I can't find it, yet.
:shock: I found it yesterday, using Google. You might not want to know, Jo ... it is something about throwing old ladies over the side of a mountain when they lose their usefulness (how could that happen??) :shock:

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Post by Jo UK » December 28th, 2008, 10:46 pm

Bociany - I think you are right - I don't want to know it!!

When I did a very brief search, all I found was references to music! I thought I might get a more sensible answer here.
So I did. :blush:

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Post by Liis » December 29th, 2008, 10:56 am

Ättestupa - well, you might say a very real (and very mythical!) generation gap. A steep cliff from where those who felt that they drew more from the clan (=ätt) resources than they contributed threw themselves down (or were helped to ...) Historians agree that there is no proof it ever existed, not even in original Nordic mythology, the story comes from the 17th century. But the word lives on anyway.

PS. (sorry, we are really Off even Off-topic)
Bociany - quite right, it wasn't old ladies who would have gone down that Ättestupa, really, they could still make porridge & other useful things, and if nothing else became witches
Mr Kotkaklubi - OK for Matriarch, but am I to believe that seeing her up there in the blue you would politely cry 'Oh, look, the Matriarch ...'

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Post by terrytvgal » January 2nd, 2009, 10:46 am

Liis wrote:Ättestupa - well, you might say a very real (and very mythical!) generation gap. A steep cliff from where those who felt that they drew more from the clan (=ätt) resources than they contributed threw themselves down (or were helped to ...) Historians agree that there is no proof it ever existed, not even in original Nordic mythology, the story comes from the 17th century. But the word lives on anyway.

PS. (sorry, we are really Off even Off-topic)
Bociany - quite right, it wasn't old ladies who would have gone down that Ättestupa, really, they could still make porridge & other useful things, and if nothing else became witches
Mr Kotkaklubi - OK for Matriarch, but am I to believe that seeing her up there in the blue you would politely cry 'Oh, look, the Matriarch ...'

Sometimes when we talk about the Bald Eagle Family we watch on the Hancock Wildlife Foundation cameras we will call them 'Lord and Lady Sidney'. It is a show of respect and affection and says that they are in charge of their territory.

If the female were flying over head you could say, "Oh look Lady Sidney is so beautiful as she flies."

But most of the time we just call them Ma and Pa. I guess we are not so repectful in English.
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Post by unp » January 2nd, 2009, 9:05 pm

A very interesting German word kirren (kirre, Kirrung).
Its meaning for the hunters is explained in http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirrung.
There are other highly amusing explanations, though: http://www.gutefrage.net/frage/was-bede ... wort-kirre.
However, if we believe http://www.woxikon.de/wort/Kirrung.php then the intriguing Kirr-Cam would translate as Bait Cam or Lure Cam. For confirmation, googling can be handy.

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Post by Kuremari » January 2nd, 2009, 9:34 pm

unp wrote:A very interesting German word kirren (kirre, Kirrung).
Its meaning for the hunters is explained in http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kirrung.
There are other highly amusing explanations, though: http://www.gutefrage.net/frage/was-bede ... wort-kirre.
However, if we believe http://www.woxikon.de/wort/Kirrung.php then the intriguing Kirr-Cam would translate as Bait Cam or Lure Cam. For confirmation, googling can be handy.
Happy New Year, unp!
glad to see you again and thanks for info :)
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Post by unp » January 2nd, 2009, 9:41 pm

You are welcome.

Happy New Year to all!!!

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Post by edziks111 » January 4th, 2009, 5:48 pm

Kasutajate nimekiri (How do you say it in englich!?)

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