Wildlife Cameras that are really good

Links to other wildlife cameras around the world.
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Liz01
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Re: Wildlife Cameras that are really good

Post by Liz01 »

November 7th

Good Morning :hi:

Solo, :hi: you're welcome :D

BLY tries to mate with LGL, while she is trying to lai her first egg
Great close up of the beautiful Lady LGL. I do not know whether the mating was successful. Maybe it was! She had visit by two males!

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Post by Liz01 »

17:22 LGL is laying her egg :loveshower:
congrats to LGL & LGK

5:07 pm she went into labor. At 5:22 pm she laid the egg. LGL checks and then settles on her freshly laid egg. 😊



Another unwanted visitor

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Post by Liz01 »

November 08

Info by Sharyn Broni, DOC:
Both LGL and GLG have laid eggs, likely within 12 hours of each other. Changeovers are usually more frequent at the early stages of incubation.

Eggs are checked and weighed on the first day as this allows a double check on fertility. A fertile egg will loose weight.

Daily checks on the identification of each albatross on each nest is carried out through the entire 79 day incubation process.

Image

Eggs are around 400g at lay date and 300g at hatch date.


egg check- Shary explains what she's doing.
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Post by Liz01 »

November 10

:hi:

The second time I saw, that a strange male mated LGL (female) Then I started to research. It seems to happen quite often.

Rape in the animal kingdom
Sociobiological theories of rape
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sociobiol ... es_of_rape

Sexual coercion among animals
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexual_co ... ng_animals
Sexual coercion in animals is the use of violence, threats, harassment, and other tactics to help them forcefully copulate.[1] Such behavior has been compared to sexual assault, including rape, among humans.[2]

In nature, males and females usually differ in reproductive fitness optima.[3] Males generally prefer to maximize their number of offspring, and therefore their number of mates; females, on the other hand, tend to care more for their offspring and have fewer mates.[4] Because of this, there are generally more males available to mate at a given time, making females a limited resource.[4][5] This leads males to evolve aggressive mating behaviors which can help them acquire mates.[5]

Sexual coercion has been observed in many species, including mammals, birds, insects, and fish.[6] While sexual coercion does help increase male fitness, it is very often costly to females.[5] Sexual coercion has been observed to have consequences, such as intersexual coevolution, speciation, and sexual dimorphism.[4][7]

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Post by Liz01 »

Sharyn Broni (Ranger, DOC) Mod • 2 days ago • edited

Kia ora koutou (hello everyone)

The cam, which is still situated 6m from Atawhai's old nest is lucky enough to be able to see two nests through the grass due to being able to pan the cam. This is not the final location of the cam for the year long 20/21 season, but an opportunity for us to at least see some of the comings and goings of albatross in this area.

Egg laying is not yet complete and when it is the Albatross Ranger Team will make a on which nest will have the privilege of being the new Royalcam family. There are many factors involved in this decision and moving the cam is a big job.

We will zoom into LGK and LGL's nest when possible, however when they are sleeping there is not too much too see. The cam will be zoomed out at other times to capture flying and potential arrivals in the area.

You will see a ranger approach the nest daily to confirm identity of however is incubating the egg. Sometimes the colour bands are visible from a distance and we do not need to get too close. Other times we need to check underneath the bird to confirm who is on. This is necessary as we will take action to protect the egg from possible desertion if a changeover period is too long. A long changeover period is considered to be 13 days and above. Albatross do not need to eat every day but longer than 15 days and we will ensure that they are hydrated
and have food if necessary.

Individual albatross sighted for this season is now over 120 and will continue to rise as younger non-breeders arrive to socialize and look for a mate over the summer months.

Egg laying has been a busy time and fertility checks have begun. These will only be done during dry conditions as the egg shell is porous and should not get wet. We have had more than 36 eggs laid so far (this was the total from last year) but will leave reporting on the final number once we are sure that we have no more on the way.

While we are looking after the birds at our place, check out these 7 Simple Actions to see if you can look after the birds at your place.

https://www.3billionbirds.o...


https://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-a ... -container
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Post by Liz01 »

November 19

Info Sharyn Broni: 39 eggs have been laid and over 120 adult albatross for the 20/21 season have been identified.
Two thirds of the eggs have been candled now. The two nests which are visible from the cam through the long grass are on fertile eggs.


Sharyn candles the egg of LGK,


Henry is hunting successfully :laugh:
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Post by Liz01 »

November 22

8:09 a skylark is preening himself
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Post by sigge »

Häpp!
Store Mosse eagle cam is going again.
It looks better than last years.

11-24 13:20 a female adult goshawk visits:
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http://utfodringen.se/
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Post by sigge »

Store Mosse 11-25

1ad. Golden Eagle 10:06, guess it is the local female Foggy:
Image

Also buzzard and goshawk.
utfodringen.se

(couldn't this be put into a new thread under Eagles called Golden Eagle :shake: )

Edit: local staff say it's the 18 years old male Fox, see better pictures here: http://utfodringen.se/nytt2021.htm
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Post by Liz01 »

November 29


Good Morning :hi:

Sharyn Broni (Ranger, DOC) Mod • 2 days ago
Just a quick note to say that if LGL is not in before the rain stops the egg will be replaced with a dummy egg and taken to the incubator. LGK has been on the best for 13 consecutive days today and this is a precaution incase he becomes unsettled and leaves the nest.

The egg would be returned when LGL is back in. This is standard procedure for all nests.


The incubator
Image

We are now at the new location for the 2020/2021 season. :loveshower:

LGK & LGL for being chosen the Royalcam couple for the 2020/21 season. they are the parents of lovely Karere

LGK (male) settles on his egg
Image

LGK waits patiently for LGL (female) :innocent:
Image
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Post by Liz01 »

Info about the new couple
https://www.doc.govt.nz/nature/native-a ... al-family/

LGK, LGL and Karere, 2019
South Plateau family.
South Plateau family (LGL sits on the chick with LGK beside)
Female
LGL (lime/green/lime bands)
Age: 11 years
Hatched: 2008
Breeding: since 2017
Chick
Name: Karere
Hatched: 24 January 2019
Fledged: 23 September 2019 at 243 days of age
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Post by Liz01 »

There will be a web Seminar with Sharyn Broni
the Webinar is planned 2020/11/30
start: 10:00 PM

Conserving the Northern Royal Albatross: a Q&A with Wildlife Ranger Sharyn Broni

Info by TheCornellLab All About Birds:
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/cams/royal-albatross/
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Post by Liz01 »

Info by Sharyn Broni DOC Ranger
Here is the media release that has come out with the moving of the webcam.

https://www.doc.govt.nz/new...

The Meet the Royal Family page is worth a look too as there is now a couple of videos on here if you scroll down.

The cam has moved 4m north to get an optimal view of LGK and LGL's nest. We will not be featuring the nest to the right which is RLK and GLG although we will see them around as they are within view of the cam when zoomed out or panning.

It looks like the final egg laid count will be 41, second highest ever and does not include any female/female pairs, which in the past have boosted the egg count as they lay and egg each.

This post has been delayed by the arrival of LGL at the nest, lots of allo-preening, but LGK is in no hurry to hop of the nest, despite having been on incubation duty for 13 days. It shows how robust the albatross are that they can last for this long without food. They are in good condition at this stage having built up fat stores over the last year following the fledging of their first chick, Karere.

The egg will remain at the nest now that LGL is in.


I will do the video from the chance later.. I need a break.
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Post by Liz01 »

LGL's return
End of video -LGK flew across the water and then circled back and did a flyby before heading off towards sea.
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Post by Liz01 »

December 1st.

LGL get's a visit from a blue banded male.


interesting! Picture is from CornellLabs.
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Post by Solo »

Liz01 wrote: December 1st, 2020, 10:50 am ... interesting! Picture is from CornellLabs. ...
thanx Liz very much - :2thumbsup:

and again big thanx to you for your work here, its great :headroll:
:wave:
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Post by Liz01 »

New Zealand Department of Conservation Ranger Sharyn Broni joins the Bird Cams project for an engaging hour of conversation about New Zealand's efforts to conserve the only mainland population of Northern Royal Albatross in the world. You'll learn all about Northern Royal Albatross natural history, the cam, and the different strategies that rangers use to help nesting albatrosses succeed as Ranger Sharyn answers questions submitted by the viewing audience.




Solo :hi: you're welcome :D
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Post by Liz01 »

December 4th

Wisdom, world’s oldest known, banded wild bird, returns to Midway Atoll


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©Birdwatching

She’s back!

Wisdom, a mōlī (Laysan Albatross) and the world’s oldest known, banded wild bird has returned to Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Battle of Midway National Memorial. The bird was banded in 1956 and is at least 69 years old. Wisdom was first spotted at her nest sit on Sunday, November 29. Biologists have confirmed that she has laid an egg. Wisdom and her mate are taking turns incubating the egg....

https://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/news/ ... way-atoll/

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Post by Liz01 »

December 6th.

:hi:

LGL has had a few visitors. A yellowhammer, red billed seagull and a strange Albatross. The seagull collected straw and flew off with it
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Post by Liz01 »

December 8th

:hi:

Info by Sharyn Broni, DOC Ranger:
Today is day 33 of egg incubation and LGK has returned to relieve LGL from nest duties. It is a chance to reunite and bond before LGL stocks up on squid for her next stint on the nest.
Temperature differences between the land and the ocean have meant that LGK had needed to cool down. Albatross do this by panting as there feathers are excellent insulation.


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