Osprey Nests in North America

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Birdfriend
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Re: Osprey Nests in North America

Post by Birdfriend » November 19th, 2017, 1:05 am

Fingers crossed, that the rescued chick can healing and will be strong enough to survive. :bow:
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Post by Cessie » November 19th, 2017, 1:31 am

:wave: Birdfriend, thank you for posting about the Port Lincoln chick!
:cry: :bow:
I didn’t know what happened as I only view the videos every few days.
:slap: I hope that the chick eats soon and has a great recovery!


Great to see and know that Borealis is alive and almost to his winter home!
Thanks for posting.
:thumbs:

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seira
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Post by seira » November 22nd, 2017, 8:22 pm

November 21

UPDATE REGARDING BAILEY
https://explore.org/livecams/ospreys/osprey-nest

Laura from the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey posted news about our warrior princess on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/AudubonCenterf ... 5324909041
"Yesterday [Monday] was a big day for patient 799-17 aka Bailey the Osprey. She made it up to the high perch in our 55' rehabilitation barn!
Up until now, she's been doing low flights and spending all her time on the lower perches. Being able to fly up to these higher perches is a good sign that her rehab is progressing; but she will require much more time to build up conditioning and stamina. Small victories like this help give us hope, as Bailey's possible release depends on continued improvement in her rehabilitation.
In the photo, Bailey is on the right and Osprey 230-17 aka “Burn” is on the left. Burn was so named as he flew through a methane flare stack and singed all his major flight feathers."

Image
and a close-up of Bailey
Image

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Post by balistar » November 24th, 2017, 3:28 pm

seira, thank you very much for this good news from Bailey. :loveshower:

"warrior princess" is just the perfect name :innocent:

As we know her she will certainly continue improvement. Poor "Burn" is looking at her. Maybe they will become friends :D

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Post by seira » December 13th, 2017, 9:57 am

December 12

UPDATE Bailey in Maitland, Florida

https://www.facebook.com/AudubonCenterf ... 6726004234
We posted a few weeks ago the news that Bailey the Osprey (patient 799-17) was making it up to the high perches in the 55 foot rehab barn. Since then however, we've noticed that she cannot sustain the height to fly from one high perch to another. Instead, from the high perches she can only glide down to lower perches.
Throughout her rescue, transport and time in the clinic, Bailey has some broken wing and tail feathers. We try to prevent broken feathers throughout the rehabilitation process, but it happens. Since there is a possibility that these broken feathers are the reason she is unable to sustain height while flying, we imped Bailey's wing and tail feathers today.
Imping is a process of gluing a matching feather from a donor bird of the same species into a damaged feather. It's an old falconry process that's been around for hundreds of years, although it's become an easier and more efficient procedure through the use of modern materials.
Now that Bailey has a full tail and set of flight feathers, we'll be able to continue to monitor her flight and see if the new feathers make difference in her flying. More updates to come when we know more.

Image

Image

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Post by balistar » December 13th, 2017, 12:58 pm

Thank you, seira, for the update.


It looks like some feather feathers and almost ALL tail feathers are broken. That saddens me a lot. Poor Bailey, all the bad things that can happen happen to her. I keep my fingers crossed that the process succeeds and achieves the desired goal. :bow:

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Post by seira » December 13th, 2017, 8:04 pm

UPDATE Bailey in Maitland, Florida

https://www.facebook.com/AudubonCenterf ... 935924313/
Many of you had questions about feather imping yesterday after we posted about the imping we had done on Bailey the Osprey. Here is a video from yesterday showing the process.

Imping is an old falconry technique that uses either molted feathers from a same species or in our case, when a bird patient passes, we can keep a full set of feathers from that donor bird. The process starts by cutting the end of the broken feather to ensure a clean edge. The same donor feather is lined up and trimmed to fit the space left in the broken feather. A small shaft drill is used to cleanly hallow out the inside of both feathers, then a small rod glued into the donor feather shaft. Historically, the rod would have been bamboo and we like to use wire, but small wooden splints or fiberglass pieces are also commonly used. Once the glue is dried, the other end of the rod can be glued into the broken feather shaft. And voila' a new perfect feather!


wishing the best for Bailey

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Post by seira » December 29th, 2017, 2:19 pm

December 27

UPDATE Bailey in Maitland, Florida

https://www.facebook.com/AudubonCenterf ... 39/?type=3
Update on Bailey the Osprey, patient 799-17: The imping of her feathers didn't get the outcome we thought we would get. We had hoped by now, two weeks later, that she'd be showing more signs of progress. Unfortunately, she is still having difficulties with high, sustained flights. We'll continue to keep you informed with any updates as they occur.

Image

and
Audubon Center for Birds of Prey : The impinge went great, and the imped feathers are still looking good. However, having full flight feathers hasn’t made her flying any better. That leads us to believe that it wasn’t the feather loss that was causing her problems with flight.

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Post by Birdfriend » December 29th, 2017, 7:14 pm

Poor Bailey, she had no luck until now. Fingers crossed, that she is somewhen to able for fly.
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Post by Cessie » December 30th, 2017, 10:15 am

Thank you, Seira for the update.
I don't know what to say, but I will say that it's bothered me ever since they said that Bailey had lost tail and other flight feathers from transport or being in rehabilitation. It bothers me because I don't understand how this could happen. :rolleyes: :unsure:
They are professionals that do good work, hopefully they will get Bailey flying.
:bow:

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Post by Liz01 » December 30th, 2017, 2:44 pm

Seira, thank you for the update!
Too bad it did not help.
I hope they can find out the reason why she can not fly :bow:

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Post by balistar » January 5th, 2018, 10:02 am

Thanks, seira, for the update.
It makes me feel so sad for Bailey. :cry:

I would like to join in on previous speakers Birdfriend, Cessie and Liz, especially Liz, hoping that the reason for the flight problems will soon be found out and that Bailey can be helped exactly.

Cessie,
it bothers me the same way and I can not understand how it can happen that Bailey loses almost all of these feathers during transport, even it was not the reason for her problems with high flights.

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Post by seira » January 18th, 2018, 3:59 am

San Francisco Bay

January 16, 2018

https://www.facebook.com/bayospreys/pos ... 9439566837
Osprey fan Dianne Ayres saw Richmond visit the nest. As we suspected, he's spent the winter in his favorite town (Richmond!) and is periodically staking his claim to that nest site where we hope he'll reunite with Rosie in March. Thanks for the great capture, Dianne!

Richmond was spotted :loveshower:

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Post by Cessie » January 18th, 2018, 5:55 am

Seira!
What Great News!!
:loveshower:

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Post by Cessie » January 20th, 2018, 7:32 am

New Foundland Osprey,
I just read a Facebook post regarding Shana.
They recovered her remains and rings and transmitter, in Colombia.
Loosely, it said that they found a restaurant near Shana’s transmitter, using an interpreter, they phoned the restaurant and were able to hire a person to recover and take pictures of Shana.
Maybe, Birdfriend will post the Facebook post.

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Post by seira » January 23rd, 2018, 7:54 am

January 22, 2018

UPDATE Bailey in Maitland, Florida

https://www.facebook.com/AudubonCenterf ... 1245340115
#MedicalMonday Take a look at these x-rays from an Osprey. There is two sets of photos: one photo set is from the bird's left wing and one from it's right wing.
Where do you see the injury, in the left or right wing? What could cause a bone to look like this? How would this effect an osprey's flying in particular?

Image

and
Audubon Center for Birds of Prey : These x-rays are from Bailey the Osprey, patient 799-17. We posted a few weeks ago that she still wasn't flying high sustained flights, and nothing has changed since then. These x-rays help explain why (check out the photo of Bailey on the x-ray table).
Her right wing joint is enlarged from the way it healed. Bones healing have osteoblasts which are bone forming cells. These cells quickly add onto the injured bone to help it heal. Then after the healing occurs, another type of bone cell, called an osteoclast, reabsorbs the excess bone to get it back down to a normal size. However, in this case, there is still a lot of a callus left in Bailey's joint, when the osteoclasts should be done reabsorbing what they will.
We are concerned about her ability to rotate her 'wrist' with the callus that is left. Osprey migrate long distances and in order to hunt fish need to be able to hover, both which require perfect 'wrist' rotation. As always we'll keep watching her and update when there is news.

Image

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Post by Birdfriend » January 23rd, 2018, 9:42 pm

Poor Bailey, we can only hope for her completely healing and rehab.
New Foundland Osprey,
I just read a Facebook post regarding Shana.
They recovered her remains and rings and transmitter, in Colombia.
Loosely, it said that they found a restaurant near Shana’s transmitter, using an interpreter, they phoned the restaurant and were able to hire a person to recover and take pictures of Shana.
Maybe, Birdfriend will post the Facebook post.
Cessie, thank you for this sad update about poor Shanawdithit. I have not find something on their FB-page.
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Post by Cessie » January 24th, 2018, 7:25 am

Birdfriend, Re: “Ospreys of Newfoundland & Labrador” is a Public Group on Facebook. Jacky Petrie, on 19/01/18 posted a few posts regarding news from Gerard Hickey, Rob’s Project leader for the Osprey tagging program in Newfoundland, and posted the pictures with permission.
:bow: please forgive me for not just posting the Facebook link!! :blush:


Seira, thank you for the Bailey, information.

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Post by Solo » January 24th, 2018, 10:56 am

Cessie wrote:Birdfriend, Re: “Ospreys of Newfoundland & Labrador” is a Public Group on Facebook. ...
source: FB https://www.facebook.com/groups/525462537604103/
Jacky Petrie, 20 január, 0:39
19.01.2018 .... So here is the Story: Gerard finds a restaurant close to the co-ordinates. He gets an Interpreter to call and thru a long conversation she gets put onto a guy named Edwin who agrees to the search for a set fee. Gerard with his Cuban Interpreter speaking Spanish as they all do at a table run thru the plan and the logistics while the interpreter ... relays the information. The search started at 6 a.m this morning. Edwin is fully successful and sent these pictures of the recovery.
one photo of 5: https://goo.gl/BA39Mp
(Gerard Hickey, Rob's Project Leader for the Osprey Tagging Program in Nfld, who initiated a recovery for Shana's transmitter in Columbia)

BOREALIS currently: https://goo.gl/Jri5Ry :laugh:
Rob Bierregaard 10 január, 4:43: Borealis' behaviour is exactly what we expect from a juvie settling down for her "gap year." The youngsters typically find their spot by sometime in the early winter and don't move much or at all for the next 15 months or so. Of course, now that I've said this, she'll probably fly to Panama tomorrow! ;-)


Cessie, TY :wave:

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Post by Cessie » January 24th, 2018, 6:19 pm

:wave: Solo, thank you!
:D

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