Autumn in Looduskalender Forum

A photographic record of seasonal changes in your area.
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NancyM
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Re: Autumn in Looduskalender Forum

Post by NancyM » September 18th, 2009, 10:56 pm

Jo UK wrote:Please will you drop me off at Elm (where the lime trees are)
Perhaps you would like to visit Linden Lane, on the other side of town?

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Kuremari
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Post by Kuremari » September 19th, 2009, 12:24 am

Jo UK wrote:Is there anyone here who can smell the first autumn day? Every year, from about late August onwards, I open the door in the morning and sniff the air. One day, and it's different each year, I can smell autumn!

There was a year, recently, when I didn't smell that autumn smell. I haven't been able to smell it yet this year, either.
Does anyone know what I am talking about? No-one at home understands this!
i know exactly what you mean... :headroll: i sniffed the scent of autumn last week...one morning it was there, just like that :D
i love this early autumn, even when it is rainy and leaves are falling, it is so relaxing - like you have all the time in the world, no need to hurry...just let life run its course :)
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Post by alice44 » September 19th, 2009, 12:29 am

Jo UK wrote:Is there anyone here who can smell the first autumn day? Every year, from about late August onwards, I open the door in the morning and sniff the air. One day, and it's different each year, I can smell autumn!
There was a year, recently, when I didn't smell that autumn smell. I haven't been able to smell it yet this year, either.
Does anyone know what I am talking about? No-one at home understands this!
I am not sure about a smell, but I know I feel it. Smell might be part of the story. Here I know a very late August or mid September rain smells different than one in early summer. Wonderful, but scary as it means the never ending rain is coming.

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Post by alice44 » September 19th, 2009, 12:34 am

bociany wrote: I tend to use both Autumn and Fall for the season, it's a sort of half-and-half thing with me (not a snobbish thing). Fall is my favorite season, and I love the autumn colors (no u). 8-)

To get to my house, if you were in the center of town, you would make these turns:

Chestnut
Garden
Elm
Winter
Autumn
Meadow
>>>(me) :mrgreen:
Lovely names -- ours are all president's names -- in date order.

I say Fall colours and Autumn leaves. When I lived in Victoria I got slapped with a ruler if I did not use the u. Initially I only used the u automatically when handwriting but as I conversed with Canadians and British online who use the u, it creeped into my typing. Plus many history of science texts I read were published in Britain and Canada.

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Post by Jo UK » September 19th, 2009, 12:43 am

Kuremari wrote: i know exactly what you mean... :headroll: i sniffed the scent of autumn last week...one morning it was there, just like that :D
i love this early autumn, even when it is rainy and leaves are falling, it is so relaxing - like you have all the time in the world, no need to hurry...just let life run its course :)
Hooray - there is someone else in the world who knows that smell.
Thank you Kuremari. I am not alone!

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Post by macdoum » September 19th, 2009, 3:00 am

I remember a radio programme (on BBC World) explaining the fact that plants have memories. Their example.. In Namibia there grows a thorny leafy bush but it has learnt to protect itself from over-eating mammals. Thes bushes grow in bunches (?) and when a herd of deer come to eat,the plants send 'word' and after the first bush all the others are now giving out a toxic smell to dissuade the animals from eating.!!
Wish I could remember more of the story... :rolleyes:
Time for :offtobed:
:hi: Alice..see ya...
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Post by Kuremari » September 19th, 2009, 7:53 pm

i was in the Viru bog and at the sea coast(North Estonia) today, the weather was very summer like, +19C and sunshine :D
but there were signs of autumn
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Post by Kuremari » September 19th, 2009, 7:55 pm

bog colours
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Post by Kuremari » September 19th, 2009, 8:02 pm

at the sea
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Post by alice44 » September 19th, 2009, 9:19 pm

Kuremari

It looks like you had a beautiful day out!

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macdoum
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Post by macdoum » September 20th, 2009, 2:50 am

macdoum wrote:I remember a radio programme (on BBC World) explaining the fact that plants have memories. Their example.. In Namibia there grows a thorny leafy bush but it has learnt to protect itself from over-eating mammals. Thes bushes grow in bunches (?) and when a herd of deer come to eat,the plants send 'word' and after the first bush all the others are now giving out a toxic smell to dissuade the animals from eating.!!
Wish I could remember more of the story... :rolleyes:
Time for :offtobed:
:hi: Alice..see ya...
Found this but Google has many more articles on the subject.
http://www.livescience.com/animals/0710 ... icate.html
(people do say, "talk to your plants,they'll grow better.!!" :shake:)
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Post by Liis » September 20th, 2009, 9:13 am

macdoum wrote: Found this but Google has many more articles on the subject.
http://www.livescience.com/animals/0710 ... icate.html
(people do say, "talk to your plants,they'll grow better.!!" :shake:)
The caterpillars: well, who wants to eat a chewed-on apple? :mrgreen:
The clover alarm network: Macdoum, what a scary scenario! - you set your foot in a nice peaceful meadow ... or beautiful mushroom forest (those mycel threads) ... and in reality alarm waves buzz all around you, millions of things raise resentful hackles ...
Tree memories: Saw a yellowing walnut tree yesterday. They shouldn't really grow here (Stockholm) at all, so from that point of view getting ready for winter is OK. But at its native home it should have plenty of time yet. So some stubbornly remember, some adapt.
Most trees are still all green, but a different green from summer's spinach suddenly, lighter and varies with kind of tree.

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Post by alice44 » September 20th, 2009, 10:36 am

Liis wrote: The caterpillars: well, who wants to eat a chewed-on apple? :mrgreen:
The clover alarm network: Macdoum, what a scary scenario! - you set your foot in a nice peaceful meadow ... or beautiful mushroom forest (those mycel threads) ... and in reality alarm waves buzz all around you, millions of things raise resentful hackles ...
Tree memories: Saw a yellowing walnut tree yesterday. They shouldn't really grow here (Stockholm) at all, so from that point of view getting ready for winter is OK. But at its native home it should have plenty of time yet. So some stubbornly remember, some adapt.
Most trees are still all green, but a different green from summer's spinach suddenly, lighter and varies with kind of tree.
I remember the first science article I read as a kid -- (I think in a nature magazine but not sure) was about plants reacting to threats to trim them. The plants had electrodes attached and if a person was thinking (or talking) about cutting off their branches they would react. My recollection was just clipping them produced almost no response. When I am trimming my house plants I always try to sneak up on them -- to not make them nervous.

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Post by Liis » September 21st, 2009, 7:56 pm

Trees dropping leaves - when? why then?
Leaf-dropping / colouring date is different by more than a month in the line of birches at Ultuna outside Uppsala, Sweden, depending on original "home".
The Abisko ones (from latitude about 68 N) were yellow in August, leaves gone by mid-September. The Skåne ones (from around 55-56 N) are expected to drop their leaves sometime mid-October to mid-November.
Largely, the Ultuna people say, length of day triggers leaf-dropping for trees in the (northern) temperate zone. 12 hours daylight in the north - oops, soon winter; 12 hours in the south - so what. New leaves in Spring are generally temperature-triggered.

Nearly overnight, roadsides have gone multicoloured round Stockholm with individually coloured trees instead of all spinach green. The trees must be good at measuring length of day by minutes :puzzled:

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Post by macdoum » September 22nd, 2009, 2:49 am

Liis,thats a concundrum...an enigma. :puzzled:
i.e maybe no one knows the answer ? Maybe nature has its mysteries too ?
'though we have always been taught that plant life is depicted by daylight, but surely soil and moisture comes into it too. AND maybe memories ?
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Post by NancyM » September 22nd, 2009, 6:55 am

Kuremari, :hi: your pictures are spectacular!! The colors are gorgeous!

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Post by Liis » September 22nd, 2009, 9:58 am

macdoum wrote:Liis,thats a concundrum...an enigma. :puzzled:
i.e maybe no one knows the answer ? Maybe nature has its mysteries too ?
'though we have always been taught that plant life is depicted by daylight, but surely soil and moisture comes into it too. AND maybe memories ?
Well, I'm all for halfway solved enigmas: makes the world a little more manageable, keeps the charm of mysteries, own theories, discussions :innocent:
In the long run probably whatever makes a tree survive better - reactions to (many) important signals, enduring difficult times - gets selected in a group. And what doesn't matter much one way or the other, from nature's point of view, may stay too. Making us sometimes desperately scratch our heads for logical explanations: there is no particular reason why :mrgreen:
(Macdoum, plants do lots of things in the dark of night ...)

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Post by Liis » September 23rd, 2009, 10:09 pm

A short article on the why and how of autumn colours in LK
http://www.looduskalender.ee/en/node/5170 ;
And why are American fall colors so much stronger and redder?
One theory is that the reds keep off bugs; bugs in Europe mostly died in the Ice age, so red was not so necessary for European trees.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32968917/ns ... e-science/ :puzzled: :book:
Sadly, the bugs have returned, there are plenty them of eating my, very European, trees and bushes,

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Post by macdoum » September 24th, 2009, 3:30 am

Liis wrote: Well, I'm all for halfway solved enigmas: makes the world a little more manageable, keeps the charm of mysteries, own theories, discussions :innocent:
In the long run probably whatever makes a tree survive better - reactions to (many) important signals, enduring difficult times - gets selected in a group. And what doesn't matter much one way or the other, from nature's point of view, may stay too. Making us sometimes desperately scratch our heads for logical explanations: there is no particular reason why :mrgreen:
(Macdoum, plants do lots of things in the dark of night ...)
SUCH AS.. ?? :D :headroll:
Carmel a member of SHOW .. I hope you love birds too. Its economical. It saves going to heaven.
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Post by Liis » September 24th, 2009, 9:37 am

macdoum wrote: SUCH AS.. ?? :D :headroll:
Well, the carbon fixation Calvin-Benson cycle, a.k.a Photosynthesis Dark Pathway Reactions, for one :innocent: .
BTW when I checked this up I saw the productivity of the poor plants is questioned, photosynthetic efficiency of only 3-6 % in turning sunshine to energy as compared to 6-20 % for solar panels …

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