Stories (not only) from the wildlife

Susanne
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Re: Stories (not only) from the wildlife

Post by Susanne »

Raptor Persecution in the UK:
Retweet by CABS:
https://twitter.com/CABS_REPORTS

RSPB Birders
@RSPBbirders
·
8 Std.
"BREAKING: Raptor persecution has rocketed

The RSPB #Birdcrime report, out today, reveals 137 confirmed incidents of #raptorpersecution in 2020, including the shooting, trapping & poisoning of birds of prey.
This is the highest figure ever recorded."
You'll find the report via this link:
https://bit.ly/3mecIwo

Quote: "In summary, there were 137 confirmed raptor persecution incidents detected in the UK in 2020. This is the highest figure the RSPB has ever recorded, making 2020 the worst ever year since the first Birdcrime report in 1990. The rise is largely attributable to the unprecedented number of incidents detected in England during 2020, many of which occurred during Covid-19 lockdowns and on land used for gamebird shooting. This figure is likely to continue rising retrospectively as the RSPB receives additional data due to Covid-related delays.
Since this total only reflects the incidents that were uncovered, it’s impossible to know how many more birds were illegally killed and never found. However extrapolation of satellite tagging studies for golden eagles and hen harriers suggest it is not unreasonable to speculate that the true number of raptors killed is far greater than the annual totals documented so far."
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Post by Polly »

A loud secret.

Last but not least, I recently wrote that detailed bird migration data should not be published.

And we don't need to wander into the distance ... even in the immediate vicinity there are enough people without meaning in everyday life who think it is great to present at least one killed animal on the Internet. Are there enough economic interests to get protected animals out of the way to make a golden business possible?
Are there enough pet owners who do not protect their animals enough - the ego is important but the protection must not cost anything.
Are there tons of videos of hand-preached natural animals in the household (owls etc.) = illegal animal trade. Mainly around the Eastern Bloc.
There are too many people who say nothing.
There are too many people for whom, on the surface, entertainment is more important than thinking
"Let nature be your teacher."
(William Wordsworth)
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Bea
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Post by Bea »

☼ ☼ ☼

This belongs to the part "Stories (not only) ..." in the headline of this topic and because I know we have fans here :mrgreen:

It is a 30-year-story ..... Metallica celebrates the 30-year-jubilee of their "The Black Album" (1991 - 2021)

AND if this b******t Corona will let them, they will be on tour in Europe in Summer 2022 :headroll:

https://www.metallica.com/tour/

- - - -

Just to remember some great songs --- "Nothing else matters" in a version from 2013, with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q93n3dvaaTI

Another one of my favourites :D
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9MNdOCQYOL8
Nature does nothing in vain (Aristoteles)
Polly
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Post by Polly »

:rotf: :faint:

Not my music (more country) but I keep my fingers crossed for all the fans.

It really is time for a colorful wild life again! Together!

🤗👍
"Let nature be your teacher."
(William Wordsworth)
Susanne
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Post by Susanne »

:wave: Bea, Polly!

My current remedy (yes, music is medecine for human beings, sometimes even for cows, horses, sharks and chicken ...) amongst others definitely is this: Bukahara, Happy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=js1iDUNSMn0

It helps against autumn/winter gloominess and cheers you up when things seem to -again - go the wrong way. (I've listened to this quite often during this watching season, *sigh...)
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Post by Polly »

Reading is definitely very fulfilling. Yes Susanne. :nod:
And calm and a form of animal presence are enough for me. Today I arrived in Denmark - vacation in the forest. I'm not drawn to the sea.
Since many cameras, including my favorite Goshawk, are not currently running, I am almost lucky enough to be able to concentrate on reading in front of the fireplace. At home it is almost impossible ... to tear up everyday life - as is the case with many of us.
I'm really looking forward to the book, and I'm curious.
It's about a woman trying to train a female goshawk. I only know so much that her endeavor ends in an obsession. This woman at some point feels more Goshawk than herself.

Do we recognize each other again?
Me myself ?

Some of us live very intensely with the animals in front of the cameras. Yes, me too.
I am really very curious.

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"Let nature be your teacher."
(William Wordsworth)
Polly
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Post by Polly »

Another story that connects me as a person with animal stories ...
This cat has been with us for 7 or 8 years since we consistently booked this house for our vacation.
There were some stray cats next to him. We were able to put one of them in good hands. A dear girl, young and still ready to come into mediation.
I always cook for them here. Sometimes they come - sometimes they don't.
This tomcat is almost always there at some point and likes to take food. I'm reporting these sightings to a German activist who has built a good network here in Denmark. The helpers come, try to catch and sterilize cats. If necessary, treatment is provided for acute illnesses and, unfortunately, euthanasia has to save hopeless animals.

It's amazing how these cats harmonize with fox and marten.
I usually watch until after midnight and then the game camera takes over. They all come in turn. Unfortunately, often, especially among stray cats, there are arguments among themselves.

Well, I'll see if my "red one" is still okay. In August I was very moved by how quickly he is getting old. Deformed ... runs stiff ... and gets careless.
Today is rainy weather. Not cheap.

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(August 2021)

Everyday stories. There is no need for a webcam.
"Let nature be your teacher."
(William Wordsworth)
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Bea
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Post by Bea »

☼ ☼ ☼

:hi: Polly and Susanne

Great to read about your preferences in music - and music is so variegated that everyone can find what makes one happy.

Polly, hopefully a good Country Band or Country Music singer will be on tour in 2022, too! Live music in a concert is very special, being a part of a enjoying community.

Have a nice and relaxing holiday in Denmark´s forest and enjoy the book, I´ve already read it.

These two are on my wish list, one for birthday and one for Christmas 8-)

Both are from Verlag Haupt

Image
https://www.haupt.ch/buecher/natur-gart ... ram=mauser

Image
https://www.haupt.ch/buecher/natur-gart ... federkleid


Susanne, until now I´ve not been aware of Bukahara, but will keep an eye (ear) on them now :D
I´ve read that they also postponed their live concerts to 2022

It seems that everyone hopes that 2022 will bring much more improvements and relief .... it is about time, isn´t it?

Metallica - I am not a Metal or Heavy Metal only fan, also like other kinds of music, but it is somewhat soothing that these wild guys also grow old and grey like me and that they still rock the stages on all continents :D


New interpretation of a wellknown classic song, from Disturbed :wink:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9Dg-g7t2l4
Nature does nothing in vain (Aristoteles)
Emi7
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Post by Emi7 »

Polly, that book has been translated into several languages.
It is a treatise on Falconry in which several parallel stories are mixed. I read it like four years ago.

Greetings
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Biker
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Post by Biker »

Hello!

hm, does it fit here?

I now live in a city. Is a lot of hustle and bustle and even at night there is not always peace and quiet.
Nevertheless, wild animals live here too.

Not only wild rabbits and hedgehogs, but eg also foxes that sneak out of the parks at night , can sometimes be seen on footpaths. They quickly disappear into dark front gardens when people pass by.

I can regularly hear tawny owls in the small cemetery in the near.
A raccoon climbed onto the roof of our gazebo in the garden the other night while I was sitting inside - the wine hangs full of grapes, which I also like to leave it there above for the birds.
A troop of swifts has been in the immediate vicinity every year for many years - ...Barn owls breed on the outskirts of town, the list is long.

But since a few weeks I don't close the windows in the evening (no not because of Covid19).

I don't want to miss a very special bird call.
That I often hear, late, around midnight - now earlier and earlier as the days get shorter, puzzles me and electrifies me in equal measure.

It's definitely calls of Eurasian Eagle Owl, male, but can it be?

At the small cemetery I mentioned.
I have to admit I thought: is it a Sound dummy? Nevertheless, I went and took repeated recordings.

I will report it to NABU, BUND, the owl protection group or similar.

Have a nice sunday evening :wave:
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Bea
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Post by Bea »

☼ ☼ ☼

:hi: Biker

Ouh wow - calls of an Eagle Owl in a town, this is thrilling - please keep us updated about the further outcomes in this matter :bow:

I saw already several contributions in TV about 'wild' animals in big cities and it is amazing how they adapt to this, not so typical, habitat for them.

As far as I know in parts of Berlin boars have become kind a plague, too many of them are around and do what boars do - they plow the ground in places where they shouldn´t do that. One reason is that they are very adaptable and the other is that some people there feed them .....
Nature does nothing in vain (Aristoteles)
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Post by Biker »

@Bea :thumbs:

I was looking for an audio uploader and uploaded one of the uhu recordings. (With the siren of an emergency vehicle in the background :rolleyes: )

https://sndup.net/82jc
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Bea
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Post by Bea »

☼ ☼ ☼

Wow, this sounds good :thumbs:

Your recordings are around mid/end of October, aren´t they? This would be time of autumn display for Eagle Owls, maybe this guy is confirming his territory with his hooting and also calling for his mate or maybe looking for a new female?

I would neither sleep with a closed window with such a concert outside not far away :D
Nature does nothing in vain (Aristoteles)
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Post by modi »

A mammal is bird of the year in New Zealand

Bats can undoubtedly fly - but that does not make them birds.
Contest organizers had included the bat, one of the country's few land-based native mammals, to raise its profile as a critically endangered species.
There was a lot of ridicule on the internet.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-59115346

https://www.birdoftheyear.org.nz/
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Post by modi »

Selling songbirds in Germany

Legal are bred birds, illegal is the catch of wild birds. How much wild birds are caught is not known. The risk of prosecution is so far low. The report "Poaching and Species ProtectionSilence in the Forest - Illegal Bird Catching in Germany" provides information to tackle this deplorable state of affairs.

Only in German:
https://www.deutschlandfunk.de/wilderei ... _id=505041
Susanne
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Post by Susanne »

https://ampoleagle.com/eagleso-nests-ar ... 861-96.htm
Quote:
"OCT 30
Eagles’ nests are shared by nearly 70 species of animals

Small birds like to visit the greater spotted eagle nests to feed and even lay eggs. But why do squirrels visit their nests and what are martens looking for there - and who proves their masculinity by killing endangered species? Professor Grzegorz Maciorowski explains.
The greater spotted eagle is the rarest eagle in Europe. A small ecosystem of organisms that feed and live there forms around the nests of these protected birds. By protecting the eagles, we protect this entire dying world.

Based on long-term monitoring of nests, together with naturalists from the University of Life Sciences in Poznań and the University of Szczecin, Professor Grzegorz Maciorowski has shown that predators living in Polish forests build 'assets' that are used by other animals.
He says, “The eagle defends its territory, and thus other predators do not attack smaller birds [present in the close vicinity - PAP]. The birds are not afraid of the eagle, because it flies out to hunt in open spaces inhabited by rodents or amphibians, which it brings to the nest. It does not hunt tit, goldcrest, or even squirrels.”
As proof, he shows pictures of a female eagle in a nest. At the same time, a chiffchaff is jumping all over the nest, looking for insects. The researcher explains that the predator brings leafy branches to the nest, there are also food leftovers there, which is why animals representing various systematic groups, including insects, live together with eagles. Smaller birds take advantage of this.
Other birds steal blades of grass and twigs from the eagles to build their own nests in the immediate vicinity. The most social ones are able to organize a breeding place literally inside an eagle's nest, between the branches it is built of.
There, nothing will threaten their eggs and chicks. Well, almost nothing. Because, apart from squirrels, which “drop in” to sit back and eat cones growing on the same tree, martens are also interested in the nest. Professor Maciorowski points out that the pine marten is a dangerous predator that destroys eagle's broods: it eats eggs or even kills chicks almost capable of flight.
Monitoring conducted by the scientists has shown that the protection of Europe's rarest greater spotted eagle is not only about preserving this particular endangered species. Preserving habitats is “to be or not to be” for many other rare species. What is the legal status of this protection now?
Professor Maciorowski cites regulations stipulating the necessity to create a 200 m radius protection zone around the greater spotted eagle's nest. Entry and any changes are prohibited in this zone all year round. Further, within a radius of 200 to 500 m, a periodic protection zone is designated, where restrictions apply during the breeding season.
In Poland, there are several thousand such places for various species of eagles and other rare birds, including some owls, rare grouse, black stork or colorful roller. The Polish greater spotted eagle population actually nests only in one place. The Biebrza Valley is home to the largest population in the European Union (90%), which numbers... about 10 pairs.
The greater spotted eagle is the most endangered eagle of the Western Palearctic. Does anyone doubt the need to protect it? “The eagle has many different problems. Its living space is shrinking rapidly, because farmers drain the swamps and sow maize in transformed areas, irreversibly destroying their feeding grounds,” the scientist notes.
Another threat is associated with the autumn migration to the south. Maciorowski says, “When flying through the Middle East, they can be shot by local poachers. Last year alone, the Lebanese probably shot about a third of all lesser spotted eagles in the world. It is also an extremely dangerous place for greater spotted eagles. Many birds die there.”
He explains that people shoot birds for cultural reasons; in Lebanon, a man's social status is the higher, the bigger the bird he kills.
He adds that the inhabitants of Mediterranean countries lay poisoned carrion to fight the golden jackal and wolves hunting sheep and goats. But according to Maciorowski, birds of prey are the first animals to find poisoned carrion. As a result, these winged predators die en masse. “In Turkey, some of our greater spotted eagles, both young and adult birds, are killed in this way. These birds are the disappearing world,” he says.
Extensive research, including nest monitoring with the use of cameras and camera traps, is expected to help in the effective protection of the greater spotted eagle, its accompanying species, and above all, the habitats of these birds. An article on this topic appeared in the American journal Ecology.
The study’s co-author, Professor Piotr Tryjanowski from the Department of Zoology of the University of Life Sciences in Poznań, says: “Our approach also has a strong theoretical and cognitive aspect and shows that the indicative role of birds of prey is based not only on food dependencies, but that their nests are local, small biodiversity centers.
“The results are really surprising. We knew that large bird nests were a magnet for other, smaller species, but – as in the case of the white stork – literally a few species were mentioned.”
Meanwhile, as many as 67 species of birds and two species of mammals used the eagles' nests. This is a world record that reflects the species richness of the Biebrza Marshes.
For over 30 years, Professor Maciorowski's team has been conducting research on rare birds of prey and accompanying species in the Biebrza Marshes, the largest low peat bogs in central Europe and one of the most valuable natural places on the continent's map.
PAP - Science in Poland, Karolina Duszczyk"

Link to the study: https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... er_Animals

(Biodiversity Hotspots at a Small Scale: The Importance of Eagles' Nests to Many Other Animals, January 2021 Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America 102(1) )
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Post by ame »

this was a very interesting article. thank you for bringing this to us Susanne! :thumbs:

i have never counted how many bird species have visited the WTE nests while i have watched them but it must be several dozen. especially in late summers the nests have been visited by a multitude of little insectivorous birds who have been filling up their energy tanks before migration.

mammals add up the number of visitors with at least the squirrel and the pine marten who visited the WTE nest when a pair of buzzards were breeding the nest in Saunja in 2012. the pine marten tried to steal their egg (the egg never hatched in the end). - by the way, in that spring before the buzzards also a mallard tried to make her nest there. she laid about half a dozen eggs before a WTE came and ate them. bad luck for Maisy Daisy.

besides these "higher" animals we have been able to see insects and spiders and even identified some species of them. we even saw a reptile once, namely a toad. :whistling:

osprey ringers have found that the wagtail is a frequent subtenant of osprey's nests so why not in an eagle's nest as well. i don't know if a wagtail has ever had a nest in any of the osprey's camera nests. every year i have waited to see a wagtail build her nest inside the WTE's castle of sticks but so far this has never happened. :whistling:

WTEs attitude towards the little visitors apparently differs from the attitude of GSEs. if GSEs don't mind their little visitors the WTE don't seem to like them. they seem to become annoyed a little like we would be when hearing a mouse rustling somewhere in the house. :rolleyes:
then they shoo the little birds away if they come too close. many times i had good laughs when for example Linda banged her wings on the nest to get rid of the great tit who was rustling downstairs where she could not see the tit but i saw her/him. :mrgreen:
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Liz01
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Post by Liz01 »

It's not only about Black Stork!

Spionieren für den Artenschutz: Einblicke in tierische Kinderstuben | Die Nordreportage | NDR Doku

Spy for the protection of species
......
Ornithologist Arne Torkler is faced with a riddle: Although the black stork has been at home in Lower Saxony for years, the population is declining despite protective measures. Predators? Lack of food? Not enough suitable areas?

With the conservationist Joachim Neumann, Torkler has installed over 50 cameras, often at dizzying heights, in forests and fields in the north with the permission of state forests and nature conservation authorities. Since then, the project cameras have been transmitting high-resolution images to Arne Torkler's cell phone without interruption. He can react and intervene 24 hours a day, seven days a week before a family tragedy breaks out.....

The nest crashed. Only one chick survived!
fish is served
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Liz01
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Post by Liz01 »

I was fascinated by the behavior of the juvenile black stork after it was released into the wild.
He didn't fly away in panic. He looked around for a while and began to search for food (successfully) even though the ornithologists were still there :2thumbsup:

He/she got a ring
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close up
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searching for food :D
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Susanne
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Post by Susanne »

Fascinating, Liz!

I just wanted to share my personal highlight yesterday.
I came back from shopping in the afternoon and when I opened the gate, I heard something. I couldn't believe my ears, but I stayed outside and waited. 21 cranes flew by!!! This is a rather rare sight here somewhere in Bavaria, they must have crossed the Lech, flew over the woods and headed - maybe? - to a resting place, we have a little lake nearby (a quarry pond with nice greenery at the banks). It was just a small flock, but so impressive. I posted this at nabu-naturgucker.de.
I know that cranes are still on the move in November, but I have never seen/noticed them before in our area. :loveshower:
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