Conservation - Preservation

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Re: Conservation - Preservation

Post by Jo UK » June 1st, 2013, 10:12 pm

Thanks for that, macdoum
We need ten of him in England.
Good man :bow:

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macdoum
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Post by macdoum » June 4th, 2013, 4:02 am

Jo UK wrote:Thanks for that, macdoum
We need ten of him in England.
Good man :bow:
There's more here Jo from Ems in Dyfi posted in 'Ospreys' yesterday..
British Wildlife- R.I.P

https://www.facebook.com/dyfiospreyproject

Please read all of this blog. :help:
Link;

http://www.dyfiospreyproject.com/blog/2 ... w-too-late
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ame
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Post by ame » July 29th, 2013, 11:21 am

In the Finnish newspaper Helsingin Sanomat there was news on July 28th (paper issue, and on July 28th in the web-issue http://www.hs.fi/ihmiset/S%C3%A4%C3%A4k ... 4895022009) about

6 osprey chicks transported from Finland to Portugal

This summer is the third summer when osprey chicks have been transported from Finland and Sweden to Portugal in a program which is to last for five years altogether. The aim of the program is to recover osprey population to Portugal. The original Portuguese osprey population was extinct in the 1990's.

After their arrival by aeroplane to Portugal the chicks will, together with osprey chicks from Sweden, first be kept in a rearing tower in central Portugal for a month. Then they will be released in nature and they are hoped to return to Portugal after their migration. In this way it is hoped that population of ospreys will be recovered in Portugal.

Prof. Pertti Saurola (74! :bow: , retired in 2002 from the Finnish Museum of Natural History at the University of Helsinki where he was the director of the Finnish ringing centre) climbed nearly a hundred trees to find osprey chicks strong enough to endure the travel by plane to Portugal. The 5-weeks old chicks were collected from nests in central Finland and they had spent the night before the flight in an aviary where they had a health examination by a vet.

In this picture Prof. Saurola is holding one of the chicks in his hand in the Helsinki-Vantaa airport.
Image
Picture by Sabrina Bqain, Helsingin Sanomat

(the chick seems to have rings in reverse order in its legs: the aluminium ring in the left and the coloured coded ring on the right ankle... or is this a mirror image of the original? :puzzled: )

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Post by andi7 » July 29th, 2013, 12:09 pm

ame wrote:(the chick seems to have rings in reverse order in its legs: the aluminium ring in the left and the coloured coded ring on the right ankle... or is this a mirror image of the original? :puzzled: )
As we can read "Finnair" in the right direction, it cannot be a mirror image.

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ame
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Post by ame » July 29th, 2013, 5:53 pm

oh! :slap: that's true of course. how silly of me. :blush:

Katinka

Post by Katinka » September 11th, 2013, 7:17 pm

Occurance of Griffin-vultures in Germany

It was an article of one of our NGOs for nature/environmental conservation - NABU - in August 2013, that informed me for the first time.
Vultures have been breeding in small parts in Southern Germany until the middle of the 19th century. Since the last years they are known as a vagrant (stray bird). Closer observations were made since 2006. Experts interpret it as an alarming sign for the lack of prey in the European home regions, Spain or Southern France.

Most likely the fewest amongst us will know that a long-term tradition in Spain was inhibited by a EU hygienic act in 2002: the "muladares" as a public place for collecting animal carcasses as carrion for the vultures. Although an exception law was created in (!) 2003, the situation hasn't changed and still is weakening the population. As reported by BirdLife International the number of successful grown-up juvenile vultures is decreasing. At the same time the number of picked-up weak adults to the birdsaving stations is increasing.
So, instead of starving, flocks of vultures are somehow migrating to other regions…
In Germany it's reported of a number of up to 100 vultures.
It's not clear that they'll find the food they'd need.
Thoughts about how to reconstruct ideal feeding grounds are already on the way, but :sleep: bureaucracy is a great handicap…
As a result of such conflicts to people with black/white thinking we had the first (?) case of a shot-down griffin-vulture. It was luckily detected by bird volunteers, earlier in summer in Hesse, a federal country in the center of Germany.
It was brought to the veterinary clinic in a nearby university town, and after a long stay now was "released" to an animal conservation park. With a shot through the secondaries, wing-span more than 2 meters, the bird will hardly ever fly again. Very sad, and disgusting! – and has made me think and research more about shooting birds in Germany. An extreme position is to ask for what reason men have to shoot on birds. We are not in Malta…


Here is the link to the (what else) German articles:
http://www.nabu.de/presse/pressemitteil ... sseservice
http://www.nabu.de/tiereundpflanzen/voe ... 06733.html

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Post by macdoum » September 13th, 2013, 8:34 pm

Alarmng number of eagles killed by Wind turbines Report from U.S.A;

http://www.foxnews.com/science/2013/09/ ... er-eagles/

See

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtgBWNKwBkE

Warning,some images you may find disturbing. :cry:
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macdoum
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Post by macdoum » September 13th, 2013, 8:54 pm

Wind turbines and Bats;
Considerations for wind turbines, birds and bats.
1. pressure differential created by the down draft of the operating turbine blades.
2. birds of prey physiologically are built to scan the below and do not see the blades of the turbine coming down from above.
3. old wind turbines have a lower gear speed ratio which causes less energy to be produced while blades must spin faster to create the energy. It is inefficient and increases the likelihood of bird strikes.
4. air pressure changes create sound waves damaging to physiology of migrating mammals, humans living in close proximity and bird populations (there is research out there but don't remember the websites)
Thanks to Skay at WVF for all the info on Wind Turbines (she is a schoolteacher) :thumbs:
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Katinka

Post by Katinka » September 16th, 2013, 9:06 pm

To this topic the newest LK frontpage article is fitting - Preventing window collisions by birds. I posted a comment recently: viewtopic.php?f=45&t=218&start=520

Anybody with relevant english websites that take up the issue?

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Post by macdoum » October 5th, 2013, 12:24 am

There has been a discovery of a new species of Owl in Oman

http://soundapproach.co.uk/omani-owl-diary-of-discovery

Listen & see this little owl.

and

http://www.birdguides.com/webzine/article.asp?a=3984
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macdoum
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Post by macdoum » October 6th, 2013, 8:22 pm

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Post by alice44 » October 7th, 2013, 7:38 am

Katinka wrote:To this topic the newest LK frontpage article is fitting - Preventing window collisions by birds. I posted a comment recently: viewtopic.php?f=45&t=218&start=520

Anybody with relevant english websites that take up the issue?
I am not sure if these are on point -- but a city near me is working on making the city safer for birds

(a little about it)
http://audubonportland.org/issues/metro/bsafe

More about making a house less dangerous
http://audubonportland.org/issues/metro/bsafe/tips

and a page with a pdf about making these dangling cord window things to keep birds from striking windows
http://www.birdsavers.com/buildyourown.html

Image

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macdoum
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Post by macdoum » October 11th, 2013, 12:19 am

:rant: Man arrested after frozen owls found....;

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/fi ... ad-2357908

Some people deserve whipping. :slap:
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macdoum
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Post by macdoum » November 12th, 2013, 3:38 am

Destruction of wildlife land in Devon
http://www.rspb.org.uk/news/357045-rspb ... paign=News

:slap: Closer to home now with the treatment of wildlife havens in Britain. :rant:
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Post by ame » January 6th, 2014, 4:01 pm

first i posted this mail in Birds, birds, birds, but now i realized it suites better here as it is news about protection of eagles.

i learned in YLE's yesterday's evening TV-news that birds have been harnessed to find reindeer carcasses killed by big carnivors in Kainuu, NE Finland. reindeer herders in Northern Finland are paid compensation by the State for those reindeer which are found and affirmed to be killed by big predators. it is a well-known fact that ravens and eagles (both golden and WTEs) are very clever in finding carcasses and then consuming them. these carcasses are difficult to find for humans especially when there's no snow even with the help of trained dogs.

big predators are making it increasingly difficult to raise reindeer especially in the Southern-most parts of reindeer husbandry area: as the numbers of these predators (bears, wolves, wolverines as well as eagles) increase they also kill more and more reindeers. this has lead increased damages to reindeer growers and to poaching of these predators, too.

now the reindeer crowers have started to utilize also birds in searching reindeer carcasses. in Suomussalmi two ravens have been equipped with radio trackers and one golden eagle (a female who was named Tytti) has been equipped with a GPS satellite tracker device.

the radio trackers on ravens weight 36 g. the first results of these experiments have been very promising, though one of the ravens as a clever bird was able to get rid of its radio transmitter back-pack in two days. it was also discovered that the radio tracking needs to be done often and regularly so that it can be seen whether the bird has found a carcass (visits one place regularly and stays in one place for a long time). it wasalso found out that the battery is a weak link in the raven-radio due to the weight limit.

the satellite backpack on the eagle weighs 70 g and can be operational for up to 5 years. the cost of the transmitter is about 3000€. the investment pays back if the eagle finds 2 carcasses a year. the golden eagle was harnessed with the transmitter in the autumn 2013 and so far Tytti has located 6 carcasses for the reindeer herders who are pleased with this result.

SOURCES: http://www.petohanke.fi/hanketiivistelma/teknologia (here you will find pictures of the birds)
Poromies-magazine 4/2012 (http://www.petohanke.fi/instancedata/pr ... _apuna.pdf)
http://ilmari.puheenvuoro.uusisuomi.fi/ ... yokaverina
(click the link ""Tytti"-niminen naaraskotka" and you'll see a picture of the eagle)

i think that making the golden eagle a reindeer herder's helper is an excellent idea. so far eagles have been considered as reindeer herders' enemies who probably kill reindeer fawns. therefore people have been killing eagles, disturbing them in the breeding time and destroying their nest tree in the reindeer husbandry area. ('people' here are someone whom 'everybody' knows but whom nobody will report to police.)
now eagles will be worth money for the reindeer growers and the protection of eagles will be in the interest of reindeer herders. :thumbs:

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Post by macdoum » January 6th, 2014, 8:08 pm

ame Thank you,for once there is good news. :thumbs:
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macdoum
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Post by macdoum » March 20th, 2014, 1:49 am

More good news,for a change. :D ;

Hunters in Iran have vowed to stop hunting wildlife;

https://www.thedodo.com/hunters-in-iran ... 86052.html

There may be some hope,a glimmer, for mankind. :2thumbsup:
Carmel a member of SHOW .. I hope you love birds too. Its economical. It saves going to heaven.
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macdoum
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Post by macdoum » March 23rd, 2014, 12:08 am

RSPB U.K. on
Giving Nature a Home
1st a video...http://homes.rspb.org.uk/
News
Now is the time for the people of Wales to show what the Welsh countryside means to them, says TV wildlife presenter Iolo Williams

Last modified: 21 March 2014

The Welsh Government’s current review of their wildlife-friendly farming scheme ‘Glastir’, will close on 28 March, and this could be our last chance to get it right for Welsh wildlife.

Once in place the scheme will run until 2020 which is also the EU deadline for the Welsh Government to halt the decline of wildlife and begin to restore it.

Given the recent declines in Welsh wildlife, if we don’t get it right now this could be disastrous for birds like curlew and lapwing, mammals including water voles and dormice, and a variety of rare butterflies and plants that rely on farmland habitats.

Following on from his emotional speech at the launch of the State of Nature report in May last year, which has been a YouTube hit with nearly 20,000 views, Iolo is urging the people of Wales to respond to the Welsh Government’s consultation seeking views on the wildlife-friendly farming scheme.

Iolo Williams says: “I thank the Minister for making the maximum additional 15% funding available for rural development in Wales. The Welsh Government has made a great first step in terms of making money available to finance Glastir, but we now need to speak up to ensure the scheme delivers the support wildlife-friendly farmers need to make real improvements for threatened farmland wildlife such as curlews, water voles and marsh fritillary butterflies.”

He adds: “I would love if the whole of Wales came together to tell the Government that supporting nature must be a priority going forward. This consultation is an opportunity to let the Government know the strength of public support for securing a vibrant countryside richer in nature.”

80% of the Welsh countryside is farmed, and Glastir is the Welsh Government’s main tool for halting wildlife loss, if we don’t get Glastir right then we will struggle to meet the target of halting wildlife loss by 2020.

Conservation charity RSPB Cymru is calling on the Welsh Government to ensure Glastir delivers four main elements.

Firstly, the scheme has to form part of a wider budgeted plan to tackle wildlife declines across Wales. Secondly, farmers need to be given the ongoing advice, guidance and support they need to make it work for them and the wildlife on their farms. Thirdly, the scheme must provide real homes for wildlife, meaning somewhere to rest, feed and breed. And finally, given that there are limited funds available, the scheme must be targeted at our very best sites for wildlife.

Iolo adds: “In the past, we have had so many disappointments and so many false dawns; I’m urging the Welsh Government to take this opportunity and really make a difference now and protect Welsh wildlife for future generations, before it’s too late!”

The Welsh Government’s current consultation on Glastir closes on the 28th March, please take this opportunity to let the Welsh Government know why protecting the Welsh countryside and it’s incredible wildlife matters to you, email your response to SLMenquiries@wales.gsi.gov.uk.

You can find out more information about RSPB Cymru’s campaign to ensure a future for wildlife-friendly farming in Wales at www.rspb.org.uk/wales (see Get Involved section).


How you can help

Nature in the UK is in trouble and some of our more familiar garden species are amongst those suffering serious declines. We can all help by giving nature a home where we live.

Create a home for nature
[/quote]
:thumbs:
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Post by NancyM » May 23rd, 2014, 5:34 am

Five people arrested for stealing Golden Eagle chicks from a nest in Spain.

:rant:
http://www.theolivepress.es/spain-news/ ... ick-heist/

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Post by macdoum » June 25th, 2014, 1:13 am

Thanks to Nancy I read that the chicks were returned to the nest.
A happy ending thanks to the police. :thumbs:

:wave:
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