Wild Pig Cam 2010 Discussion Cam 2 Boars and Bees

Webcams of Wild Boar Feeding During Winter Time
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Fleur
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Re: Wild Pig Cam 2010 Discussion Cam 2 Boars and Bees

Post by Fleur » July 11th, 2010, 11:26 am

I have the feeling that we look through the camera lens and through the window of the hives
they are busy at work, make honey I think :D
while ago actually barking of dogs

I still can not see where the Queen could be :puzzled:

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Post by Bleggi » July 11th, 2010, 8:07 pm

An other picture - did anybody change the honeycombs?
19:56
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I was out of computer for some time, now I am online again. :loveshower:
Kindest regards to all friends of Looduskalender
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Post by Fleur » July 11th, 2010, 8:49 pm

bleggi :hi:

whether it comes from the sun?
They are still busy
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asteria
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Post by asteria » July 12th, 2010, 12:05 pm

The cam will be closed soon. :cry:

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Post by edziks111 » July 12th, 2010, 12:34 pm

asteria wrote:The cam will be closed soon. :cry:
its closed now :cry:

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Post by Fleur » July 12th, 2010, 1:58 pm

I can still see the bees :D
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Post by asteria » July 12th, 2010, 2:17 pm

edziks111 wrote: its closed now :cry:
Nope, now it is working yet but they promis to close it: http://www.looduskalender.ee/node/7829

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Post by Fleur » July 12th, 2010, 11:12 pm

is still under construction, and a dog barking in the background

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Post by macdoum » July 13th, 2010, 2:34 am

We thank the people who put up the project and the farmer,of course. :loveshower: We have had a close look at the bees activities and I hope some children got to see the cam too. It is a great idea and I hope it will be repeated.
Thank you. :thumbs:
:wave:
Carmel a member of SHOW .. I hope you love birds too. Its economical. It saves going to heaven.
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Post by Bleggi » July 13th, 2010, 10:07 am

macdoum wrote:We thank the people who put up the project and the farmer,of course. :loveshower: We have had a close look at the bees activities and I hope some children got to see the cam too. It is a great idea and I hope it will be repeated.
Thank you. :thumbs:
:wave:
I like to say the same as macdoum. It was a great joy to open this camera and to watch several kinds of animals. I also thank all the people who made it possible.
We will see us next to christmas to watch the wild boars again, so god and you will.
Thank you to macdoum, alice44 and all the other people who watched with me, too.
Bye, bye - Bleggi :hi:

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Post by alice44 » July 13th, 2010, 10:15 am

I am curious if the first group of bees that disappeared are alright. Given all the troubles one hears that bees are having that disappearance was a bit worrying.

But overall this cam made a wonderful addition especially to our winter and spring viewing and it will be interesting to see what sneaky improvements may be tried for viewing bees or whatever next year.

:wave: Thanks

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Post by macdoum » July 13th, 2010, 6:49 pm

I have just seen the bees but there is a change. Has the honey been collected ?

edit; cam disconnected..
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Post by greeneyes » July 13th, 2010, 7:12 pm

the bees are always busy

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and busy

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I like boars.

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Post by alice44 » July 13th, 2010, 10:35 pm

Yes the bees seem very busy at the moment.

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Post by Liis » July 14th, 2010, 10:40 am

I would love a camera in a bumble bee nest.
The bees are so busy and industrious, make my bad conscience scream at me. Of course bumblebees work very hard too, but it isn't so apparent.

Working hard: these days there are many dead bumblebees under lime tres. (If anywhere, a nice place to die - if one has to ...). Some maintain they are just worked out - the trees are so huge, and so many bees gather there, some are bound to be found dead, others say there is a lethal component in lime nectar: in some lime trees (species or individual) or for some bumble bees.
Does anyone know more?

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Post by alice44 » July 14th, 2010, 11:22 am

Liis wrote:I would love a camera in a bumble bee nest.
The bees are so busy and industrious, make my bad conscience scream at me. Of course bumblebees work very hard too, but it isn't so apparent.

Working hard: these days there are many dead bumblebees under lime tres. (If anywhere, a nice place to die - if one has to ...). Some maintain they are just worked out - the trees are so huge, and so many bees gather there, some are bound to be found dead, others say there is a lethal component in lime nectar: in some lime trees (species or individual) or for some bumble bees.
Does anyone know more?
I have to read more -- after I sleep, but I have seen comments about lime nectar over powering bees and many comments about it attracting bees so....

A pdf from a British Brochure on trees good for bees
http://www.britishbee.org.uk/files/BBKA ... _3-way.pdf

Lime Can supply large quantities of nectar when conditions are right but can be erratic.
Aphids on some species produce honey-dew. (N)
Tilia cordata Small leaved lime. Late Jul
§T. x euclora Crimea lime. No honeydew. Jul–Aug
T. x europaea Common lime. Jun–Jul
T. maximowicziana Japanese lime. Jun
§T. x orbicularis Hybrid lime. Jul–Aug
T. petiolaris Weeping silver lime. Jul–Aug
T. platyphyllos Broad leaved lime. Jun–Jul
T. tomentosa Silver lime. Jul
§ Nectar in these species can stupefy bees.

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Post by greeneyes » July 15th, 2010, 1:20 pm

My grandfather and my second father take two honey crops in one year. The first crop at the end of spring, then the bees came back from the rape fields, the name of the honey is “rape honey”, the second crop at the summertime and the name of this honey is “lime blossom honey”, because the nectar from the big lime trees and their blossoms is dominant in the summer honey of Northern Germany.
I like boars.

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Post by Jo UK » July 16th, 2010, 8:07 pm

About Lime trees -

http://www.lifeworks.uk.com/Lime%20Tree.htm

Medicinal Action and Uses

Lime-flowers are only used in infusion or made into a distilled water as household remedies in indigestion or hysteria, nervous vomiting or palpitation. Prolonged baths prepared with the infused flowers are also good in hysteria.

In the Pyrenees they are used to soothe the temporary excitement caused by the waters, and been used twith success against spasms. The flowers of several species of Lime are used.

Some doctors prefer the light charcoal of lime wood to that of the poplar in gastric or dyspeptic disturbances, and its powder for burns or sore places.

If the flowers used for making the tisane are too old they may produce symptoms of narcotic intoxication.

So it is mildly relaxant and tranquillising, unless one uses old flowers. Then it is "narcotic" (sleep-inducing)

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Post by macdoum » July 18th, 2010, 12:18 am

Liis wrote:I would love a camera in a bumble bee nest.
The bees are so busy and industrious, make my bad conscience scream at me. Of course bumblebees work very hard too, but it isn't so apparent.

Working hard: these days there are many dead bumblebees under lime tres. (If anywhere, a nice place to die - if one has to ...). Some maintain they are just worked out - the trees are so huge, and so many bees gather there, some are bound to be found dead, others say there is a lethal component in lime nectar: in some lime trees (species or individual) or for some bumble bees.
Does anyone know more?
In the local newspaper today,an article about the different capacities of Bumble bees to pollinate,even in glasshouses.
The 'farmer' can buy a hive of Bumble bees and he puts it in a G/house for the tomatoes then when they have completed that task he takes them to the glass-house for strawberries where they are less active already and so pollinate the flowers more slowlyy/carefully and..
The bumble-bees die after six weeks.. :cry:
That,he said is their life-span. :roll:
Carmel a member of SHOW .. I hope you love birds too. Its economical. It saves going to heaven.
Emily Dickinson

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Post by Liis » July 18th, 2010, 9:17 am

macdoum wrote:-------------In the local newspaper today,an article about the different capacities of Bumble bees to pollinate,even in glasshouses.
The 'farmer' can buy a hive of Bumble bees and he puts it in a G/house for the tomatoes then when they have completed that task he takes them to the glass-house for strawberries where they are less active already and so pollinate the flowers more slowlyy/carefully and..
The bumble-bees die after six weeks.. :cry:
That,he said is their life-span. :roll:
Interesting! That the bumblebee colony, except the new queen, dies in autumn I did know, but not that the life of the workers was so short. And obviously it isn't poor overworked industry-exploited creatures only.
Quick check (Swedish environment): lifetime of workers is 3-5 weeks, up to two months for some few individuals, development from egg takes 3-4 weeks; for queen lifetime 12-24 weeks - counted from first laying of eggs, which means her lifetime can actually be 3-4+ months longer (overwintering, finding new nest etc).
This makes the explanation that the dead bumblebees under lime trees are individuals who have simply reached the end of their life reasonable. There is such a great number of bees and bumblebees in the huge lime trees - the trees purr and hum like cats - and starting from spring, this would be a common end period.
Hmm - not individually marked bumblebees then. It would be heartbreaking. But a bumblebee nest camera would still be nice ...

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