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A White-tailed Eagle Database Project

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Re: Talk about

Post by maertha » September 4th, 2015, 6:19 pm

Scotland: Sea eagle released after operation to remove fish hooks :2thumbsup:

See also: 27 June 2015 viewtopic.php?f=46&t=236&start=300
Read more: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-hig ... s-34152942

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Post by maertha » September 6th, 2015, 12:39 am

Eagles and swans


aita3331, August 2015

In 2010 cygnets were brought to the LK White-tailed Eagle nest by the Estonian breeding pair Linda and Sulev. One young swan escaped over the rim when the eaglets in the nest were seven weeks old (June 2010). Aivar Veide published another video which shows the hunting behaviour.

[youtube]UPUGOdbN1IQ&gl=US[/youtube]
EestimaaLooduseFond, October 2010

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Post by maertha » September 8th, 2015, 6:57 pm

Denmark: Eagle chick stares back :D

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Post by maertha » September 14th, 2015, 7:26 pm

Ireland: Cealtra explores Lough Derg

“Since fledging in mid July, Cealtra, the 2015 young female White-tailed Sea Eagle has been gradually finding her wings.” She is one of 4 sea eagle chicks fledged this year from nests in Ireland. “All 4 chicks are now flying about and gaining much needed experience of their environment while still, in most cases, being pretty much dependent on their parents for food. The last fledged chick (in south Kerry) has yet to leave the nest area, happily hanging out in the beautiful glen she hatched in while her parents return every now and then with food.” (Golden Eagle Trust)

Image
Photograph of the monastic remains on Inis Cealtra, Co. Clare, Ireland. By JohnArmagh (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

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Post by maertha » September 20th, 2015, 11:09 am

Spain: Tougher penalties for wildlife crime

“A court in Santander (northern Spain) has found a farmer guilty of laying out poisoned baits that killed at least eleven red kites (Milvus milvus), an endangered species, as well as five dogs, six foxes, a cat, a raven, a buzzard and four vultures. The farmer was sentenced, on 8 June 2015, to two years in prison and post-release: two years disqualification from farming or animal husbandry; four years disqualification from hunting, a fine of €90 270, and an additional fine of €28 500 to be used to monitor red kites over the next three years. This is the most severe sentence to be passed for this type of crime in Spain.” (EU Environment/LIFE Programme, 14 July 2015)

Illegal poisoning: What can you do?

“If you know of someone doing something wrong in your family or circle of friends - speak to them - tell them you don't want illegal poisoning or illegal killing of raptors anymore. If we all refuse to tolerate it - it will decline! If you know of someone doing something illegal and cannot speak to them" - phone the police and tell them you want to report a wildlife crime. (Golden Eagle Trust, 19 September 2015)

Image
Example image, American Bald Eagle, poisoning is suspected. Public Domain.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region (Bald Eagle Found Dead Uploaded by AlbertHerring)
[CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons


See also:

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Post by maertha » September 24th, 2015, 6:05 pm

Why did Neanderthals capture birds?

Image
Forensic reconstruction of an Homo neanderthalensis. By Cicero Moraes (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0
(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons


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Post by maertha » September 27th, 2015, 1:05 am

27/28 September: “A full moon, harvest moon, super moon, and total eclipse of the moon—this one has it all”
Read more: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015 ... g-viewing/


Published by National Geographic, 26 September 2015


Elephant Revival "Ring around The Moon”. Published April 2014 by KDHX

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Post by maertha » October 4th, 2015, 2:09 pm

Swords into plowshares: Drones as conservation tool

“While there used to be an association of drones with the military, I think this perception is changing quickly. Drones are no longer solely for the military; they are now commonly used for humanitarian work, research and conservation.” (Serge Wich from Conservationdrones.org, see ARKIVE interview below)

More information:

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Post by maertha » October 4th, 2015, 3:05 pm

Sea eagle nest monitoring via UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle)

Eugene Potapov has used this modern technology successfully in Siberia since 2012 (see video below). He and his ornithologist colleagues from Russia/USA/UK “published a paper on the practicalities of usage of the quads in remote regions (no electricity, no roads, no computers)”. According to the paper, this was "the first application of the UAV to survey raptors’ nests during routine surveys in Russia and possibly in the world." Title: Usage of UAV for Surveying Steller’s Sea Eagle Nests. PDF in Russian and English, photos and more information here: http://diydrones.com/profiles/blogs/qua ... agle-nests
  • Germany: Eagle expert Peter Hauff and quadcopter owner Dietrich Papendorf were able to count young White-tailed Eagles in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania with a flying roboter even in well-hidden nests this season. Hauff and Papendorf needed a special permission from the local conservation authorities for their teamwork. The use of hobby drones is regulated in many countries, and there are a lot of “No Drone Zones” like national parks and other protected or private areas. Article in German http://www.svz.de/lokales/zeitung-fuer- ... 33911.html
  • Canada: Biologist James Junda uses UAVs to monitor Bald Eagle, Osprey and Hawk nests. Photos: http://manitobaliberals.blogspot.ca/201 ... -uavs.html Article in the Journal of Unmanned Vehicles Systems: Proper flight technique for using a small rotary-winged drone aircraft to safely, quickly and accurately survey raptor nests. James Junda, Erick Greene, David M. Bird; September 2015. Abstract in English available: http://nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10. ... lCode=juvs

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Post by maertha » October 6th, 2015, 8:11 pm

Durberts, the chick in the Latvian “Eagle TV” nest, turned out to be a (Dur)berta

Image
Screenshot/photomontage: maertha; symbol by Flanker (Own work) [CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

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Post by maertha » October 9th, 2015, 11:04 pm

In union there is strength :2thumbsup:

“North West Mull Community Woodland Company(NWMCWC) has become the first community woodland in Scotland to host a successful breeding pair of White-Tailed Sea Eagles. Co-operation between the local community, forest managers (Tilhill Forestry), harvesters and the RSPB meant that these protected birds were given the best possible chance of success. Two chicks were ringed in June 2015 and fledged the nest in August.” Read more http://forargyll.com/?p=101935
  • Image
    Map: Isle of Mull, 1654. Public domain
See also:
  • Managing forests for White-tailed Eagles. Kenny Kortland, Richard Evans, Andy Douse and Gordon Patterson. Forestry Commission Scotland, March 2011.
    See doc. # 164 viewtopic.php?f=46&t=233&start=160
  • Balancing commerce and nature conservation. White-tailed Eagles in the forests of the Oberlausitzer Heide- und Teichlandschaft Biosphere Reserve (Seeadler im Wald – Balanceakt zwischen Schutz und Bewirtschaftung). Dirk Weis, Oliver Harig. Saxon State Ministry of the Environment and Agriculture, Germany. See doc. # 119 viewtopic.php?f=46&t=240&start=120

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Post by maertha » October 10th, 2015, 7:30 pm

Czech Republic: Eagle Victor died from suspected poisoning

An exhausted eagle was rescued by conservationists on New Year´s Day. After some weeks in a wildlife center he was fitted with a satellite tag and released. The male bird, named Viktor, was the country´s only transmitter fitted White-tailed Eagle. Last week he was found dead near the village of Hornosín, region South Bohemia. The body appeared well fed and had no visible injuries. Officials say they will perform a necropsy to determine what killed Viktor.

Image

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Post by maertha » October 16th, 2015, 9:08 pm

Ireland: Aoibheall alive and well :D

This update was published by the Golden Eagle Trust today. As reported, the young female eagle apparently lost her GPS transmitter in late May. Nobody has seen her since then. Now it was confirmed that she was spotted on September 21st. The bird could be identified via wing tags.
  • More about Aoibheall, her siblings and the reintroduction project here, see 26 July 2015

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Post by maertha » October 30th, 2015, 8:17 pm

Fall bird migration is still in full swing. Do White-tailed Eagles migrate?

“In general, White-tailed Eagles do not migrate, but some specimen, especially immature birds, can make long travels before they start to breed." (Baltic region). Source & migration map: http://birdmap.5dvision.ee/en

Geese

Nick Cave - To Be By Your Side. Published by Indeepsilence, April 2012

“Adults of central Europa mostly sedentary [Mebs & Schmit 2006]. Birds from northern Russia and northern Asia mostly migratory [Bauer et al. 2005]. Northern birds may spend the winter in central Europa, for example in Austria along the Danube or along the March river (border between Austria and Slowakia). Juveniles and immature birds move around more.” Read more http://www.europeanraptors.org/raptors/ ... eagle.html

According to the Finnish Museum of Natural History, the local White-tailed Eagle population is partly migratory. The “individuals move in very separate rhythms: on the same day one individual may still be on its wintering grounds, the second on its spring migration and the third already back on its breeding grounds i.e. spending “summer”.” (Finnish White-tailed Sea Eagles in satellite tracking)

Info:

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Post by maertha » October 31st, 2015, 6:36 pm

Samhain or Halloween?

Image
By 3268zauber (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)],
via Wikimedia Commons


Samhain (pronounced /ˈsɑːwɪn/ SAH-win or /ˈsaʊ.ɪn/ SOW-in Irish pronunciation: [sˠaunʲ]) is a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the "darker half" of the year. Traditionally, Samhain is celebrated from sunset on 31 October to sunset on 1 November, which is about halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice.” (Wikipedia)

Image

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Post by maertha » November 2nd, 2015, 9:16 pm

New Wildlife Crime Documentary: Red Sky on the Black Isle

Wildlife filmmaker Lisa Marley published last month a short film about the so called Ross-shire Massacre. Video description: "In 2014, 22 birds of prey including 16 red kites were found dead in one small area of the Black Isle in Scotland. One year on, the locals are making sure this tragedy is not forgotten." According to Raptor Persecution Scotland, 16 of those birds were killed by “an illegally-held poisonous substance”. Nobody has been arrested. Read more https://raptorpersecutionscotland.wordp ... arbofuran/

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Post by maertha » November 2nd, 2015, 9:17 pm

Carbofuran: Key Facts
  • What is carbofuran?
  • How does carbofuran kill?
  • How to recognise poison bait?
  • How to recognise poisoned animal?
  • What to do if you find poison bait or poisoned animal?
Read more: http://www.karbofuran.cz/fakta.php?m

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Post by maertha » November 2nd, 2015, 9:22 pm

Image Book Tip: Carbofuran and Wildlife Poisoning - Global Perspectives and Forensic Approaches. Ngaio Richards (Editor) 304 pages, November 2011
  • International Journal of Toxicology: “The book provides a compelling read to nonscientists as well as scientists in the area of ecology and wildlife conservation, and its integration of the toxic effects of carbofuran to a country’s resources and ecological system.” (Source: Wiley.com)
    Description, more reviews, table of contents here http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle ... 45231.html
  • Jane Godall about the book: "Carbofuran and Wildlife Poisoning is a collection of meticulously researched papers from all around the world that provide shocking facts about the effects of a deadly insecticide on wildlife. The book discusses the hundreds of thousands of animals, from elephants to fish, that are poisoned each year, the efforts to rehabilitate those which have been rescued, and the often heroic efforts to ban or reduce the use of the deadly chemical. This book is a must for all those concerned with the problem." (Source: Google Books)
    Preview available via Google Books

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Post by maertha » November 3rd, 2015, 7:43 pm

Dziobem i pazurem (Beak and Claw)

Polish documentary about raptors, corvids and other animals by Krystiana Matyska

Upload: Przyroda Polski, October 2014. Documentary, 53 minutes

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Post by maertha » November 7th, 2015, 2:30 pm

Ireland: Update on the White-tailed Eagle reintroduction project

Image
Public domain
  • “Thirteen pairs held territory in Ireland in 2015 (Fig. 1). At least nine pairs built nests and eight pairs laid eggs. For the first year since breeding began in 2012 more than one pair successfully fledged chicks: five pairs hatched chicks across four counties with four of these pairs fledging a single chick each (Table 1).” Source: Golden Eagle Trust. Read more: http://www.goldeneagletrust.org/index.p ... Itemid=132

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