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A White-tailed Eagle Database Project

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Re: Talk about

Post by maertha » May 8th, 2015, 6:18 pm

Ireland: “A pair of White-tailed Sea Eagles will have brought at least a million euro into Mountshannon by the end of summer

Last year, a White-tailed Sea Eagle Viewing & Information Point opened on a pilot basis at Mountshannon Pier in Co. Clare. Over 10,000 people flocked to Lough Derg between July and September, generating more than half-a-million euro for the local economy in the process - according to Clare County Council, which funds the facility.” Read more: http://www.clarechampion.ie/eagles-caus ... y-to-soar/

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Post by maertha » May 18th, 2015, 7:16 pm

How to find White-tailed Eagles in the Netherlands

Information on WtE hotspots + birding area map, provided by forester Thomas van der Es. Click on "Tips & Tricks"/"De zeearend spotten". Hotspot map available as PDF. Info in English by BBC-cameraman Paul Edwards: See video 1:24 http://www.biesboschinmij.nl/

About De Biesbosch: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Biesbosch

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Post by maertha » May 21st, 2015, 1:07 am

Image Book Tip: The word-hoard: Robert Macfarlane on rewilding our language of landscape

"For decades the leading nature writer has been collecting unusual words for landscapes and natural phenomena – from aquabob to zawn. It’s a lexicon we need to cherish in an age when a junior dictionary finds room for ‘broadband’ but has no place for ‘bluebell’.” Read more http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/f ... -landscape

About Robert Macfarlane: “Robert Macfarlane won the Guardian First Book Award, the Somerset Maugham Award, and the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award for his first book, Mountains of the Mind. His second, The Wild Places, won three prizes and was adapted for the BBC. The Old Ways was joint winner of the Dolman Travel Book of the Year Award, and shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize and eight other awards. He is a Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.” (Source: Amazon)

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Post by maertha » May 23rd, 2015, 3:12 pm

Congratulations, Denmark! First eaglet in the TV-nest

Webcam: http://pandion.dof.dk/kort-nyt/hav%C3%B ... gen-i-2015

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Post by maertha » May 25th, 2015, 8:50 pm

Isle of the sea eagle: 'It's our version of the wolf'

Britain’s biggest bird of prey is back from extinction and thriving on Mull. It’s great news for wildlife tourists, but the sheep farmers are yet to be convinced.”
Read more: http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ ... ep-farmers

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Post by maertha » May 26th, 2015, 5:38 pm

Miracle number 2 has arrived in the Danish TV-nest
  • [youtube]Utxpdz-EP5c#t=20[/youtube]
    Published by DOFBirdLife, 26 May 2015

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Post by maertha » May 30th, 2015, 2:18 pm

ImageWhite-tailed eagle project celebrates significant milestone: BBC Springwatch reveals 100th breeding pair on Hoy

Forty years after white-tailed eagles were reintroduced to Scotland, these magnificent birds have reached the important milestone of 100 breeding pairs.”
Read more: http://www.rspb.org.uk/news/400963-eagl ... tish-pairs

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Post by maertha » June 1st, 2015, 7:41 pm

Isle of Skye: RSPB report highlights importance of wildlife to Skye economy

Following a survey of visitors to the island, RSPB Scotland has issued an economic impact assessment which indicates that Skye’s tourism businesses are receiving a significant boost from visitors hoping to see some of the island’s charismatic wildlife. In particular, Skye seems to be benefiting from its growing reputation as a place to see sea eagles.
Dr Alison MacLennan, RPSB Scotland’s conservation officer for Skye and Wester Ross, said, “The number of people visiting the island hoping to see sea eagles has steadily increased year on year over the past 10 years. We have had a tremendous demand for our sea eagle guides, produced as part of the Heritage Lottery Fund-supported SEEVIEWS project, which indicate where the birds can be seen and how to identify them. And, of course, a number of businesses have been started in recent years on Skye, to cater for the increasing demand to see these magnificent birds in the wild, with wildlife guides and tour boats now operate from many locations around the island.”

The report indicates the value of wildlife tourism on the island is worth nearly 200 jobs with sea eagles, which have been heavily profiled on TV in recent years, being particularly effective in attracting visitors.

Dr MacLennan said that in order to cater for the interest, RSPB Scotland have partnered with Forestry Commission Scotland to trial a sea eagle viewing facility at the Commission’s site at Kylerhea. She said, “We have been overwhelmed by the positive response we are receiving for our Date with Nature project at Kylerhea. It is a brilliant location, overlooking the narrows that separate the island from the mainland, where visitors are able to experience, at first hand, all the wonderful wildlife that can be seen there. Otter, seals, dolphins, porpoises and seabirds are all regular if not daily occurrences.. The star of the show is, of course, Victor the sea eagle who regularly turns out to entertain the visitors while he goes about stealing or catching fish to feed his off-spring.”
  • Image
    Loch Coruisk, Isle of Skye. Sidney Richard Percy, 1874, public domain
The Kylerhea viewing facility is manned from Tuesday to Saturday by Andy Law and Jake Butcher, both local residents, who are based at a new hide purpose-built by the Forestry Commission. Dr MacLennan said, “Many visitors travel across the narrows using the ferry so they have an opportunity to enjoy the total experience from the heart of where the action takes place as well as viewing it from the shelter of the hide. But whether you are in the hide or on the water, it is awe inspiring to watch Victor catch a fish in mid air as the gull that he is pursuing decides it is safer to give up its meal than end up being the meal itself!

“We are very grateful for the support of Forestry Commission Scotland which shares our vision of encouraging both visitors and local residents to experience the wonderful wildlife that exists on our doorstep here on Skye. It is very encouraging that the growing wildlife interest, as demonstrated by this economic report, is also benefiting local businesses and creating sustainable employment for local people.”

Text: RSPB press release, 31 May 2015
Photo: Martin Mecnarowski http://www.photomecan.eu/

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Post by maertha » June 3rd, 2015, 9:29 pm

Good news

There´s new hope for the White-tailed Eagle reintroduction project in Ireland: “Eight pairs of eagles nested and laid eggs with five of these hatching chicks in counties Cork, Clare, Kerry and Galway” (source: The Irish Times). And the “Icelandic Institute of Natural History reports that 51 eagle pairs have been spotted nesting around Iceland, breaking last year’s record, which was itself a record year for eagles in Iceland” (source: Grapevine). Read more:

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Post by maertha » June 6th, 2015, 10:33 pm

Would you see the third eagle? A note on alternative family structures

"Cooperative or ‘communal’ breeding occurs when more than two birds of the same species provide care in rearing the young from one nest.” According to current knowledge, only a few percent of bird species are cooperative breeders. But the number of undetected cases might be high.

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Screenshot and Photomontage: maertha/Latvian WtE cam http://dabasdati.lv/lv/kameras2015

Would we notice a third parent bird in or around a White-tailed Eagle nest where we usually expect to see a pair? Experiments show that it´s even possible to overlook a gorilla... “Cooperative groups may be overlooked in raptors (...) for several reasons:

(1) there are few raptor studies involving banded birds;
(2) many species have large territories, making it difficult for observers to see all individuals residing in the territory;
(3) many raptors are sensitive to disturbance and will avoid their nest or behave abnormally when a human observer is present; and
(4) distance between territories may make it difficult to monitor a large number of nests in enough detail necessary to detect cooperative behavior. In addition, because most raptors are thought to be monogamous, additional birds may be viewed by casual observers as transients and thus not recorded.” (Kimball et al 2003)

The most creative raptor concerning family structures seems to be the Madagascar fish eagle: “35 percent of the known breeding population exhibits cooperative breeding strategies”. (For more information see e.g.: Population status of the Madagascar Fish Eagle Haliaeetus vociferoides in 2005–2006, G. Razafimanjato et al. or The Eagle Watchers/Madagascar Fish Eagle, Ruth E. Tingay.) There are also some reports of Bald Eagle (Garcelon et al. 1995) and other eagle breeding trios. Gunnar Bergo, for example, describes such a group of Golden Eagles in Norway: “All three birds in the 'trio' took part in all breeding activities, but only two were sexed with certainty.”

Occasionally the White-tailed Eagle cooperates in a similar way. As yet I found these sources:
  • Scotland: “The establishment of the reintroduced population was slow at first. No eggs were produced until 1983 when one of two breeding attempts involved a trio (a pair with a second female); both clutches were damaged as a consequence. Such trios have since been observed in the Scottish population several times, and may persist for several years.” White-tailed Eagle. John A. Love in: The Birds of Scotland, 2007

    Unspecified: “Some eagles breed in polyandrous trios (one female with two males); this occasional behavior has been reported for some white-tailed sea eagles and Spanish imperial eagles”. The Eagle Watchers: Observing and Conserving Raptors around the World edited by Ruth E. Tingay and Todd E. Katzner, 2010

    Ireland: “White-tailed Eagles have successfully hatched chicks across four counties in Ireland. Eight pairs of White-tailed Eagles have nested and laid eggs with five nests successfully hatching chicks in counties Clare, Cork, Galway and Kerry. In the last few weeks’ chicks hatched in nests on Lough Derg at Mountshannon, Co. Clare, at Glengarriff in West Cork, and in Killarney National Park, Co. Kerry. Pairs also successfully hatched chicks at a nest in Co. Galway for the first time and at another site in Kerry. Three other pairs nesting in Kerry failed to hatch successfully. Interestingly two of these ‘pairs’ were made up of trios: two males and a single female at one site and two females and a male at another, both in Kerry!” Press release. Golden Eagle Trust, 2 June 2015. Update breeding Trios in Kerry: See Golden Eagle Trust at Facebook, 21 September 2016 https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php? ... 4808950774
Update, 16 August 2017. UK/Scotland. Also interesting: “A male sea eagle has successfully raised chicks from two different nests in East Scotland for the first time ever in Scotland. The eight year old male sea eagle, known as Turquoise Z, has been travelling between Angus and Fife visiting two nests, more than 28 miles apart, and raising chicks with two different females.” Read more at: http://www.fifetoday.co.uk/news/environ ... -1-4532872

  • Bergo, G. Territorial behaviour of Golden Eagles in Western Norway. Brit birds 80: 361-376, August 1987
  • Drew, T., Vo, M. L., & Wolfe, J. M. (2013). The invisible gorilla strikes again: Sustained inattentional blindness in expert observers. Psychological Science, 24(9), 1848–53
  • Garcelon, D. K., G. L. Slater, C. D. Danilson, and R. C. Helm. 1995. Cooperative nesting by a trio of Bald Eagles. Raptor Research 29:210-213
  • Kimball R. T., Parker P. G., Bednarz J. C. 2003. Occurrence and evolution of cooperative breeding among the diurnal raptors (Accipitridae and Falconidae). Auk 120, 712-729

Edit: The third eagle in the Latvian nest in the picture above was added by me ;-)

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Post by maertha » June 10th, 2015, 6:59 pm

Tragic incident in the Danish TV-nest: Eagle chick injured by parent bird

Dansk Ornitologisk Forening Webcam: http://pandion.dof.dk/kort-nyt/hav%C3%B ... gen-i-2015

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Post by maertha » June 13th, 2015, 10:32 am

New: Looduskalender Multi-Camera View

Urmas Lett created a new feature – now it´s possible to view all cameras at once. Click on the link or the screenshot below to see at a glance what´s happening at all monitored places. Click any of the thumbnail images to view the corresponding camera. The images should refresh automatically after 2 minutes. If that doesn’t work, try the "Refresh" button of your web browser. http://pontu.eenet.ee/

Image
Thanks to Urmas Sellis for submitting the link. Screenshot: maertha

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Post by maertha » June 18th, 2015, 8:07 pm

New database launched on the 5th June in Brussels: EuroBirdPortal (EBP)

"The purpose of EBP is to establish a European data repository based on aggregated data from online bird recording portals from across Europe. (…) The EBP is a project of the European Bird Census Council (EBCC) developed through a partnership that currently comprises 29 institutions from 21 different European countries.” Read more: http://www.eurobirdportal.org/ebp/en/about/#ebcc

[youtube]-7KVhyt7Rsw&feature=youtu.be&gl=US[/youtube]
Published by ICO Vídeos 28 May 2015

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Post by maertha » June 20th, 2015, 9:18 pm

How do birds fly?


Published by thependulumswing, 17 October 2012

Image
Screenshot: maertha, Latvian WtE cam http://www.looduskalender.ee/en/node/22386

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Post by maertha » June 22nd, 2015, 9:02 pm

How does an eagle fly?

Image
Screenshot: maertha, Latvian WtE cam http://dabasdati.lv/lv/kameras2015

“The Body of an eagle is made for flying and for catching prey. To do these things, the body must be light in weight and very strong. It must be light enough to get off the ground and fly high in the air, but strong enough to swoop down on prey and carry it away. To make their bodies lighter in weight, eagles have hollow bones.” Read more at: The Bald Eagle´s Quest for Flight http://my.kwic.com/~pagodavista/schoolh ... s/body.htm "The Bald Eagle and the White-tailed Eagle are sister species." (Global Raptor Information Network. Species accounts: Haliaeetus leucocephalus and Haliaeetus albicilla)

Fligth of a White-tailed Eagle in slow motion

Published by nagata yasuhiro, 4 January 2013 (Japanese feeding ground)

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Post by maertha » June 23rd, 2015, 5:52 pm

Hall of shame

A male eagle and his two 11 week old young were found dead from suspected poisoning in and below a nest near the village of St. Michaelisdonn in Dithmarschen, northern Germany. Dithmarschen is a district of Schleswig-Holstein, located between the Eider and Elbe rivers.
  • Image
According to the newspaper SHZ, eight breeding pairs have been registered in this area in spring 2015. Only four of these pairs started a breeding attempt, three of them without success due to human disturbance. The dead birds were the last remaining White-tailed Eagle family in the region. 16 White-tailed Eagles have been reported as missing here between 2005 and 2014, said local bird conservationist Uwe Robitzky in an interview with the newspaper Kieler Nachrichten, adding that in 2015 already six adult eagles disappeared.

In March a male eagle died shortly after it was found emaciated and unable to fly near the city of Heide, the capital of Dithmarschen. A post-mortem revealed some days ago that the raptor had been poisoned by the illegal insecticide parathion (E605). In February a buzzard and a dog died about 20 kilometres away after feeding on a hare, prepared as a bait with the same insecticide.

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Post by maertha » June 24th, 2015, 10:01 pm

Northern Germany: Happy ending for “homeless” White-tailed Eagles :2thumbsup:

The eagle´s 130-year-old and 30 metres tall nesting tree had been cut down by unknown persons in mid-February. The pair used the now destroyed nest in the municipality of Stangheck, Schleswig-Holstein, at least since 2007. According to the SHZ, the birds managed to raise one eaglet in a "temporary quarter" in the same area despite the difficult conditions. The chick has successfully fledged.

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Post by maertha » June 25th, 2015, 6:21 pm

Update: Female eagle found dead too near the village of St. Michaelisdonn in Dithmarschen, northern Germany

The carcass lay 15 metres away from the nest where the bird´s mate and two eaglets died some days ago. Experts say is likely that the raptor family was poisoned. The eagle's body will be sent to the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin for a necropsy.

Image
Public domain

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Post by maertha » June 27th, 2015, 8:33 am

Scotland: Sea eagle saved after x-ray shows he swallowed two fish hooks

“Animal experts have saved the life of a young white-tailed sea eagle which swallowed two fish hooks. The bird of prey was also wrapped tightly in fishing line when it was found at Loch Arkaig in Lochaber recently.”

Colin Seddon, manager of the Scottish National Wildlife Rescue Centre, said: “Although the majority of fishing enthusiast are responsible and clear away their lines and tackle after use, sadly, there is a minority who do not and this causes suffering to many animals every year. We would urge all anglers to consider the welfare of wildlife and clear away any lines and tackle after use as this could save an animal’s life.”
  • Image
    Assorted fishing lures. Public domain

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Post by maertha » June 30th, 2015, 11:07 pm

Chick and female eagle in the Latvian nest

Image
DON´T touch my food :mrgreen:
Image
Screenshots: maertha/Latvian WtE cam http://dabasdati.lv/lv/kameras2015

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