Latvian WtE nest webcamera: Juras-erglis 2015

White-tailed eagles in Latvia

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Abigyl
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Re: Latvian WtE nest webcamera: Juras-erglis 2015

Post by Abigyl » June 23rd, 2015, 2:11 pm

14:10 Prey

Looks like skinless with 4 little legs :puzzled: Mole? Rat? Rabbit?

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Post by Hellem » June 23rd, 2015, 2:14 pm

:hi:
It seems to me that the prey is a "cleaned" bird without feathers :puzzled:

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Post by Liz01 » June 23rd, 2015, 2:16 pm

Hellem wrote::hi:
It seems to me that the prey is a "cleaned" bird without feathers :puzzled:
Hellem, that could be :nod:

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Post by Abigyl » June 23rd, 2015, 2:18 pm

Hellem wrote::hi:
It seems to me that the prey is a "cleaned" bird without feathers :puzzled:
I thought like you but then I saw it had 4 little legs and none is like bird's talon.

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Post by Liz01 » June 23rd, 2015, 2:23 pm

Hellem wrote::hi:
It seems to me that the prey is a "cleaned" bird without feathers :puzzled:
Abigyl wrote:I thought like you but then I saw it had 4 little legs and none is like bird's talon.
Ame knows a kind of mouse that lives in and around water. At the beginning, there was already such a delivery

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Post by Hagnat » June 23rd, 2015, 2:28 pm

Liz01 wrote:I have not read it in the newspaper. It is a scientific study of eagles
quote="Hagnat"]We don't know yet what Durbis has read.[/quote]
Liz01 wrote: I will ignore you in future.
You know everything better than anyone else. You're too good for this world
My impression from your reaction was that you're the one who knows better.
I really don't understand what your problem is. I tell what I know and you tell what you know. So what? There are many people here who know nothing about these things and for them I try to place what is observed here in the context of what is known.

When you combine various reliable sources (excluding Wikiedia) the time between hatching and fledging of young WTE varies between 10 and 13 weeks.
It remains to be seen how strict Durberts will follow the rules. Perhaps you can predic the moment by counting the number of poops?

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Post by Liz01 » June 23rd, 2015, 2:31 pm

Image

Image

it is still unclear to me what it is :unsure:

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Abigyl
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Post by Abigyl » June 23rd, 2015, 2:32 pm

A kind of Beaver ??

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Post by Hagnat » June 23rd, 2015, 2:34 pm

Owlie wrote:Here is data of Finnish WTE:s, it says that birds can fledge in age of 70-77 days - but it says nothing of leaving the nest. Even fledged eaglets return to the nest some time before leaving it.
http://www.luontoportti.com/suomi/en/li ... iled-eagle
Fledging is usually understood as leaving the nest. Of course they can come back now and then, but they also come back to trees in the vicinity. So sometimes it means leaving the nest as permanent home.

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Post by ame » June 23rd, 2015, 3:43 pm

Liz and Hagnat please both calm down. :bow:
i don't want to see anyone fighting here. :cry:
... can't i stay out for a couple of hours without any disaster taking place. i'm very unhappy now. :(

i think you were talking about slightly different things. one of the first time of flying out of the nest and the other about when they leave altogether, not returning anymore.

i have understood that 'fledging' means the first time the bird chick leaves the nest and i have understood that it takes place at about 11 weeks of age (according to newer handbooks and according to what we have seen in earlier years). older books give shorter times but i think (guess) this is due to the difficulty of seeing when the chicks have hatched. i think that Hagnat was writing about this.

after the virgin flight eaglets still use the nest as a home base where parents bring food and eaglets eat and rest both in the daytime as well as sleep in the nights. this phase takes a few more weeks during which time eaglets make longer and longer outings till finally they forget to come back. i think Liz was writing about this.

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Post by Bea » June 23rd, 2015, 3:47 pm

Is "branching" no official stage in development (literature, etc.)?
Nature does nothing in vain (Aristoteles)

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Post by ame » June 23rd, 2015, 3:55 pm

Bea, not in general bird handbooks, because branching is not a thing which all birds do. some just run, swim or drop out of their nest. for example lapwings, curlews and black grouse chicks just start walking and never return to the dip on the ground which was their nest. tits drop out of the nest hollow and start to fly immediately.

bigger birds (birds of prey mostly i think) start to climb out of the nest to surrounding branches. branching for them is an important stage in their development. one other example of bird who do this is tawny owls: owlets climb out of the nest hollow, drop down and start to walk and climb in the bushes around the nest.

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Post by bobbcat » June 23rd, 2015, 3:59 pm

ame wrote: after the virgin flight eaglets still use the nest as a home base where parents bring food and eaglets eat and rest both in the daytime as well as sleep in the nights. this phase takes a few more weeks during which time eaglets make longer and longer outings till finally they forget to come back. i think Liz was writing about this.
This has certainly been the pattern with bald eagles here in the states.

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Post by ame » June 23rd, 2015, 4:04 pm

i'm looking for information about fledging in books.
John A. Love writes (The return of the Sea Eagle, Cambridge University Press, 1983, p. 69)
... The youngster is fully developed at 10 weeks and most will undertake their first flight at about this time; occasionally though an eaglet might be found to remain in the eyrie for an additional week or two.
i can't find Love writing about branching.

edit: i didn't write much anything in the classic book by Johan Willgohs either. he writes in The white-tailed eagle Haliaëtus albicilla albicilla (Linné) in Norway (Norwegian University Press, 1961) that the eaglets in Norway leave their nests by mid-July - latter part of July, but he does not write how old they are then. Norway is such a long country in South-North direction that WTEs lay their eggs over a long period of time. the time window which Willgohs gives reflects this variation.
searchfledging, searchliterature

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Post by Bea » June 23rd, 2015, 4:08 pm

Yep, I supposed so, it is mentioned in literature about some birds, but as they all have their very individual way of leaving the nests ... :laugh:

Last year we had the stage of "rooflings" at the Tawny Owls, because they climbed out of the box and up on the roof :laugh:

Ospreys chicks become hardly branchlings, because many of their nests are on highest top of the trees, with mostly any reachable branches around. When they take off, then they fly.

The young German Eagle Owls, which fledged shortly, also were fledgelings without becoming branchlings first, their nest was high on a ledge, no branches or even trees near to even become a branchling before taking off.

Sometimes it will depend on the local possibilities.

Edit: question about branching as "official" state of development was meant here for birds of prey only ...
Nature does nothing in vain (Aristoteles)

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Post by max18 » June 23rd, 2015, 4:29 pm

ame wrote:Liz and Hagnat please both calm down. :bow:
i don't want to see anyone fighting here. :cry:
... can't i stay out for a couple of hours without any disaster taking place. i'm very unhappy now. :(

i think you were talking about slightly different things. one of the first time of flying out of the nest and the other about when they leave altogether, not returning anymore.

i have understood that 'fledging' means the first time the bird chick leaves the nest and i have understood that it takes place at about 11 weeks of age (according to newer handbooks and according to what we have seen in earlier years). older books give shorter times but i think (guess) this is due to the difficulty of seeing when the chicks have hatched. i think that Hagnat was writing about this.

after the virgin flight eaglets still use the nest as a home base where parents bring food and eaglets eat and rest both in the daytime as well as sleep in the nights. this phase takes a few more weeks during which time eaglets make longer and longer outings till finally they forget to come back. i think Liz was writing about this.
Ame I think that in a forum like this where people are involved in each country it is possible that they can be born of the real misconceptions, misunderstandings. If we consider that most likely many of us use a translator of languages to communicate in English, and then make understandable what he means in his language, I also noticed that sometimes the words that one must translate not always reflect what oneIt would mean in reality.
Having said that I very much hope that our friends make peace and continue to follow us / to our Durberts .... sure that the godmother Liz certainly can not refrain
Hello Durbe, wherever you are I hope you are flying happy ... we miss you.

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Post by ame » June 23rd, 2015, 4:47 pm

some more liturature study: Wolfgang Fischer writes (Die Seeadler, A. Ziemsen Verlag, 1959, p. 80)
Die ersten flugversuche führen vom Horst auf die benachbarten Äste des Horstbaumes, doch es dauert sehr lange, bis die Jungadler, obwohl sie offensichtlich flügge sind, den ersten Flug wagen. Sie sind dann etwa 70 Tage alt.
...
Die Alten halten sich schon von der 5. bis 6. Woche ab nicht mehr soviel im Horstrevier auf, sondern blocken oft halbe Tage lang miteinander auf ihren Standwarten im Jagdrevier. Die ersten Flüge der Jungvögel führen oft nicht weit.
i'll try to translate with the help of G-T:
"the first flight attempts lead from the nest to branches of the nest tree. it takes rather long before the eaglets take their first real flight (?). they are then about 70 days old.
...
the parents do not spend all their time near the nest from 5 - 6 weeks onwards, but stay waiting in their hunting grounds for half the days. the first flights of eaglets don't usually reach far."

16:39 music started! a Midsummer festival. :laugh:

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Post by ame » June 23rd, 2015, 4:58 pm

max18 wrote:Ame I think that in a forum like this where people are involved in each country it is possible that they can be born of the real misconceptions, misunderstandings. If we consider that most likely many of us use a translator of languages to communicate in English, and then make understandable what he means in his language, I also noticed that sometimes the words that one must translate not always reflect what oneIt would mean in reality.
Having said that I very much hope that our friends make peace and continue to follow us / to our Durberts .... sure that the godmother Liz certainly can not refrain
i totally agree with you. misunderstandings are likely to happen when people communicate in a language which they are not born with, like most of us do here. those of us who have been following the lives of Durberts and his parents for a longer time know how often Liz for example apologizes for her English and still she bravely goes on reporting events here in a foreign language.

i have tried my best to keep my language fairly simple and sentences short. i know what a mess Google translator can make out of a longer sentence. i don't know how well i succeed in this effort... :blush:
now i have difficulties figuring out what to write about this misunderstanding to these two but for different reasons. :dunno:

now something completely different: i don't know how long it will take before this music starts to get on the nerves.... but it is better than the motor noise i think. 8-)
i guess that the feast will go on till next morning... or will it, vainamoinen?

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Post by bobbcat » June 23rd, 2015, 5:02 pm

Anyone else besides me hearing music in the background?

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Post by krobbe » June 23rd, 2015, 5:05 pm

Abigyl wrote:14:10 Prey

Looks like skinless with 4 little legs :puzzled: Mole? Rat? Rabbit?
Could it be a baby-muskrat? Alredy skinned? Or a Beaver dito also skinned.
Be yourself, there's enough of all the other

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