Bird Behavior: A Discussion

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macdoum
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Re: Bird Behavior: A Discussion

Post by macdoum »

Birds 'heard tornadoes coming' and fled one day ahead.


http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-30531060

From BBC News 'Science & Environment.

This doesn't surprise me one bit. :thumbs:
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Liz01
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Post by Liz01 »

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sova
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Post by sova »

https://www.20min.ch/story/13560-km-jun ... 9422747445

FROM ALASKA TO TASMANIA:
13,560 km – young snipe breaks world record for longest non-stop flight
A bar-tailed godwit, only five months old, spent eleven consecutive days in the air. Its journey of well over 13,000 kilometers could now earn the bird an entry in the Guinness Book of Records.





After hatching in Alaska in the summer, the bar-tailed godwit was given a GPS chip and a small solar panel by researchers, with the help of which their flight route could be tracked. According to BirdLife Tasmania's Eric Woehler, he was too young to determine his sex at the time.

At the tender age of about five months, the snipe with the identification number 234684 took off in the Yukon-Kuskwokin Delta in Alaska on October 13 and then set a course southwest towards Japan. The bird then flew southeast over the Aleutian Islands before crossing Kiribati and New Caledonia and flying past the Australian continent. Finally he flew due west and after 11 days and 8435 miles (13,560 km) he landed on the northeastern tip of Tasmania.

"We don't yet know whether the bird got lost or whether these are normal patterns in bird migration," Woehler told the Herald Standard. It is also unknown whether the bird flew in a flock with other animals or alone. "There are so few birds that have been tagged that we don't know how representative this flight is."

The voyage of 234684 – the researchers assume that this took place without a single stopover – should now earn the snipe an entry in the Guinness Book of Records. So far, the record was 12,200 kilometers, which a bar-tailed godwit also covered from Alaska to New Zealand. The same bird surpassed this performance the following year, covering 13,000 km, but the Guinness Book has not yet recognized this.

One thing is certain: 234684, which landed in Tasmania on October 24th, now has to eat a lot to regain its strength. He lost half his weight of around 400 grams on the trip.

https://twitter.com/looksouth?ref_src=t ... F13560-km- young-snipe-breaks-world-record-for-longest-nonstop-flight-149422747445
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sova
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Polly
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Post by Polly »

Thanks @sova! :thumbs:
interesting to see. Most of the time I only hear these/similar sounds without seeing the situation.


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Post by Susanne »

Kotkaklubi is loading up Black Stork infanticide clips on You Tube, dating from 2008. Does anybody know why?
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Post by Urmas »

Yes, there is a reason. It was easiest way to show those infanticide cases to my Spanish colleague, preparing short paper about that phaenomena. Some of samples are fixed by our cameras. There are more cases used in paper, but not all we know from different countries. Those old clips were not stored in YT before.
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Post by asteria »

At the same time three years later in Tiit&Tiina family the parents behad absolutely opposite to Donna. Tiit did help little Neli to hatch, both parents never discriminate her giving her enough food and Tiit specially left to feed her alone until she was able to start her migration.

Here is the video of Neli's hatching I found on the forum:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mhb6fvB2L-E&t=6s
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Post by Susanne »

Thank you Urmas for the info :thumbs: I just was a little confused since these clips appeared so suddenly and somehow 'out of context' - for me. - And thank you also Asteria for some extra info on how differently birds cope with such situations.
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Post by sova »

ISRAEL - This tiny bird was ringed in Estonia this summer and weighed just 18 grams. It flew 3,000 km from Estonia to Israel.
https://www.facebook.com/HeferBirdStation
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Post by Susanne »

sova wrote: September 22nd, 2023, 7:32 pm This tiny bird was ringed in Estonia this summer and weighed just 18 grams. It flew 3,000 km from Estonia to Israel.
Thank you Sova :thumbs: I just looked at it - it came from Matsalu, yippieh!
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Post by Polly »

Yes, let's also consider how far butterflies migrate.
My goodness...these delicate sensitive creatures.... :innocent:

(https://www.tierwelt.ch/artikel/wildtie ... nge-412580)

Thank you @sova! :2thumbsup:
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Post by Liz01 »

sova wrote: September 22nd, 2023, 7:32 pm ISRAEL - This tiny bird was ringed in Estonia this summer and weighed just 18 grams. It flew 3,000 km from Estonia to Israel.
...
sova :hi: thanks for sharing :2thumbsup: I'm always amazed at how far such small individuals can fly.It's incredible!
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Post by Liz01 »

Attenborough: The amazing Lyre bird sings like a chainsaw!

it is true! 🤣 stunning birds!



It mimics sounds incredibly well. There are more sounds to be heard. The chainsaw can be heard at the end
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Post by sova »

Splendid :laugh:
....I'm just imagining if you were closer to humans, what kind of sounds would come out?
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Post by sova »

Polly wrote: September 24th, 2023, 9:00 pm Yes, let's also consider how far butterflies migrate.
My goodness...these delicate sensitive creatures.... :innocent:

(https://www.tierwelt.ch/artikel/wildtie ... nge-412580)

Thank you @sova! :2thumbsup:
Thanks Polly
very interesting article....you already know something but not everything.
...."they migrate in several generations"....amazing
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Post by balistar »

Liz01 wrote: September 26th, 2023, 3:55 pm Attenborough: The amazing Lyre bird sings like a chainsaw!
...
:thumbs:


Btw: the Lyre bird was the inspiration for a start-up in Montreal, Canada.

Jose Sotelo, one of the three founders of the start-up, like his two business partners, has a scientific background: He is doing his doctorate in the field of artificial neural networks - a sub-area of artificial intelligence. This exact technique is used in “Lyrebird”.

Artificial intelligence
“Lyrebird” – a lyrebird for every voice
Using a short sound recording as a sample, a Canadian start-up can imitate any voice in a deceptively realistic manner. This may be of great help to people who have lost their ability to speak. It could be a disaster for confidence in the spoken word.

It is unclear whether “Lyrebird” can hold its own on the market in the long term.


taken from: https://www.deutschlandfunk.de/kuenstli ... e-100.html
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Post by Liz01 »

balistar wrote: September 27th, 2023, 7:58 pm .... This may be of great help to people who have lost their ability to speak. It could be a disaster for confidence in the spoken word
artificial intelligence can be beneficial. But in the future it will be difficult to decide what is true and what is a lie. What's real, what's wrong. But it won't be stopped. Just like nuclear power, or more precisely, nuclear fission. It has advantages and also big disadvantages. Humans decide what they use. And as a rule we also uses the less “good side” of the coin
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Post by Liz01 »

Author Shai Blitzblau (Shai Blitzblau currently works at Hefer Valley Bird Research Station and Israel Wader Research Group. Shai does research in ornithology )
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1216946 ... 837137696/

Gallinago media: three days and 9 hours = 4225 km of non-stop migration
The Great snipe are amazing in the dimensions of their migration with a complex physiology and much that is hidden over the visible - the research and the information collected presents a clear and continuous picture of the migration of the nesting population in Europe, from northeastern Poland to the Sahel region in Africa (south of the Sahara) in 3 to 4 days on average! This is an active and non-stop flight migration at a speed that can even reach 160 km/h (under optimal wind conditions). ☝️ See the detail that left on August 6 in the evening at 18:25 from northeastern Poland and landed on August 10 at 03:25 in the morning In Africa in Niger - a total of 81 hours (3 days and 9 hours) of non-stop migration, a maximum measured speed of 100 km/h and a flight altitude of 5600 km above sea level and a total of 4225 km traveled! Wonderful are the Great snipes

*Many thanks to the Polish research team for the information to the Lublin Ornithological Society and Natura International Polska www.dubelt.org.pl /
the photo from © Emek Hafer 2021
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