Black Stork Nest 2, Jan and Janika, 2021

Cameras Watching over Black Storks nest
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Solo
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Re: Black Stork Nest 2, Jan and Janika, 2021

Post by Solo »

Liz01 wrote: July 11th, 2021, 8:05 am 19:31 on July 10! Benjamin is not begging for food. He is sitting in the nest
my opinion: it isn't Benjamin, it is one another chick who is laying (mostly of the day)
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asteria
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Post by asteria »

It is sick but alive. Someone in the chat is deliberately writing nasty things.
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Bibibu
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Post by Bibibu »

Hello all,

The poor chick is lying in the sun, no food, no water.

I hope it doesn't have to suffer much longer.

Such symptoms could also be consistent with dehydration, couldn't they?

if it is salmonellosis, would that mean that the other chicks would get infected too!?!! Or can they fight it naturally and survive?
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Anne7
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Post by Anne7 »

.
Poor little storklet. 😢

I can't get the below article, published on Looduskalender on the 1st of July, out of my head.

Could it be that cyanobacteria caused this affliction?
The parents brought a lot of water to the nest...

Obviously, only a (post-mortem) examination (autopsy) can determine the cause of this suffering.
I hope the storklet’s agony will end soon. :unsure:


A summer plague on our waterbodies
Blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, can be seen on the banks of our waterbodies, which are coloured yellowish-green with "flakes" visible to the naked eye.
In some places, the shoreline may be covered with a dense, green or blue-green mass, and in such places we can smell the odour of the algae.
The seawater is warmer than a few dozens of degrees Celsius, and large clusters of blue-green algae can also be observed in the open sea during windless periods.
https://www.looduskalender.ee/n/node/5779


This is the link to more information (pdf file) posted on Looduskalender:
BLUE-GREEN ALGAE OR CYANOBACTERIA
BLUE-GREEN ALGAE INFESTATION
Blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, are ancient organisms that can live in almost any environment - in water bodies, wet soils, tree bark, extreme conditions (polar regions, tropics, salt water, deserts), as symbiotes on palms, mosses, sponges, etc. The blue-green algae phylum contains about 150 genera and 2000 species. To date, nearly 400 species of blue-green algae have been identified in Estonia.
They are most abundant in freshwater.
In temperate lakes, they are more abundant after the spring stratification(?) of the watermass, when the surface water layer has warmed up. Warm, nutrient-rich waters are an ideal habitat for blue-green algae.
Blue-green algae are always present in the water, but they need at least a week or more of warm windy weather and nutrients - especially nitrogen and phosphorus - to thrive. Nitrogen can be taken up by them from both water and air, while phosphorus can only be taken up from water.
The most common blue-green algae in the Baltic Sea that can also produce toxins are Nodularia spumigena, Aphanizomenon spp. and Anabaena spp.
In freshwaters, blooms are mostly caused by the genera Microcystis spp, Aphanizomenon spp, Anabaena spp, Planktothrix spp and Gloeotrichia spp.

...
https://www.terviseamet.ee/sites/defaul ... rid.pd.pdf


I also found this article on the internet:
Algae Intoxication in Livestock and Waterfowl
Blue-green algae toxins include (1) hepatotoxic peptides that are known to be toxic to cattle, dogs, swine, waterfowl, and sometimes other species; (2) a nicotinic agonist neurotoxin that appears to be toxic to a wide range of animal species; (3) a peripheral-acting cholinesterase inhibitor that is very toxic to swine, birds, and dogs; (4) toxins that impair nervous transmission by blocking sodium channels in nerve cells; and (5) lipopolysaccharide endotoxins.
This article provides current information on the mechanisms of action of the primary toxins recognized to date as well as on procedures important in the diagnosis and management of some of the more common cyanobacterial toxicoses in livestock and waterfowl.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 2015309804
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Bibibu
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Post by Bibibu »

Anne7 wrote: July 11th, 2021, 1:29 pm .
Hello Anne, I also find what you are writing totally understandable.
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Birdfriend
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Post by Birdfriend »

Solo wrote: July 11th, 2021, 11:42 am my opinion: it isn't Benjamin, it is one another chick who is laying (mostly of the day)
Solo :wave: I just open the topic. What is happen there? Do you know something?
The nature needs us not, but we need the nature
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Liz01
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Post by Liz01 »

In my opinion, no bacteria, no poison triggers a sudden tip-over while preening. That must be something neuralgic :puzzled:
besides, it is one-sided! poison and bacteria act systemically
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Post by Solo »

Birdfriend wrote: July 11th, 2021, 2:15 pm Solo :wave: I just open the topic. What is happen there? Do you know something?
yesterday in the evening one of chicks (in my opinion our little Benjamin) suddenly fell on its back while preening - and he can't get up, he rolled from his back to the side in the evening and he is still capable of certain movements, but his left side is probably seriously damaged (neurological problem? who knows)
am very sorry for our Benjamin
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Post by Birdfriend »

Bibibu wrote: July 10th, 2021, 11:12 pm [ Is it Benjamin, who fought his way through so bravely as the smallest?! [/color]
...
Yes :cry: , he was my favourite storklet on this nest, it hurts me so much. It's not fair, he is such a fighter.
The nature needs us not, but we need the nature
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Bibibu
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Post by Bibibu »

Solo wrote: July 11th, 2021, 11:42 am my opinion: it isn't Benjamin, it is one another chick who is laying (mostly of the day)
Hello Solo, :wave:
don't you think it looks like Benjamin?! Ok, it's lying there now, so it might already look small, but if you look at the colouring and the fluff on the other chicks, it's getting less and less, especially on the head. That's not the case with the sick one, so I would assume it's Benjamin. :puzzled:
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Birdfriend
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Post by Birdfriend »

Solo wrote: July 11th, 2021, 2:29 pm yesterday in the evening one of chicks (in my opinion our little Benjamin) suddenly fell on its back while preening - and he can't get up, he rolled from his back to the side in the evening and he is still capable of certain movements, but his left side is probably seriously damaged (neurological problem? who knows)
am very sorry for our Benjamin
Thank you Solo, it makes me very, very sad. :cry: :bow:
The nature needs us not, but we need the nature
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Liz01
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Post by Liz01 »

13:10 it looks so normal
Image

13:14:44
Image
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Bibibu
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Post by Bibibu »

Birdfriend wrote: July 11th, 2021, 2:39 pm Yes :cry: , he was my favourite storklet on this nest, it hurts me so much. It's not fair, he is such a fighter.
Yes, it's true, the brave little stork.

But what I don't understand is that he can also lift, bend and turn his head in all directions, even kick both legs when he wants to get up. So it would only affect the wing area after all....I don't understand it.
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Liz01
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Post by Liz01 »

14:47 Jan brings fish
after feeding he is looking for Benjamin

14:50 Storklets are nodding.. begging .. he flew off again
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Bibibu
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Post by Bibibu »

I would love to put him back on his legs to see if he could sit again when he is no longer lying on his wing. Some animals fall over on their backs and can't get up from this awkward position, maybe little Benjamin can't get up because he is lying on his wing and in a hollow.
We have just seen it again, both legs were wriggling, the neck and head could bend and the right wing also works, but not the long wing, where he naturally lies with his whole weight on it.
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Poliff
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Post by Poliff »

Solo wrote: July 11th, 2021, 2:29 pm yesterday in the evening one of chicks (in my opinion our little Benjamin) suddenly fell on its back while preening - and he can't get up, he rolled from his back to the side in the evening and he is still capable of certain movements, but his left side is probably seriously damaged (neurological problem? who knows)
am very sorry for our Benjamin
This is a typical behavior in avian salmonellosis. Search in Google and you will see the symptoms one by one. :arrow:


"In birds, salmonellosis can occur in a super-acute, acute, chronic form or in the form of a carrier without showing clinical signs of the disease.

The acute form of salmonellosis is characterized by non-specific signs: lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, polydipsia (often accompanied by polyuria) and diarrhea. I.e., the bird is sluggish, refuses to feed, drinks a lot, it has a lot of free water in the litter, diarrhea. Also, the bird may have an enlarged abdomen and goiter, as the peristalsis of the gastrointestinal tract is disturbed.

With the development of septic arthritis, there is a sagging or protruding of the wings and lameness.

In the subacute or chronic course of the disease, signs of damage to the central nervous system (convulsions, disorientation), arthritis (especially in pigeons), dyspnoea and signs of damage to the liver, spleen, kidneys, heart develop. With a high intensity of the infectious process, conjunctivitis, iridocyclitis and panophthalmia can develop. In laying hens, egg production decreases, the mortality of chicks increases."
https://vkdoc.ru/bolezni-ptitc/salmonel ... ptitc.html
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Post by Solo »

Bibibu wrote: July 11th, 2021, 2:39 pm Hello Solo, :wave:
don't you think it looks like Benjamin?! Ok, it's lying there now, so it might already look small, but if you look at the colouring and the fluff on the other chicks, it's getting less and less, especially on the head. That's not the case with the sick one, so I would assume it's Benjamin. :puzzled:
it is Benjamin, my answer is to this video by Liz (Benjamin begged, fight bravely and ate -all day little one seemed to me O.K.):
Liz01 wrote: July 11th, 2021, 8:05 am 19:31 on July 10! Benjamin is not begging for food. He is sitting in the nest ...https://youtu.be/C5urUThZXxs
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Post by Solo »

Poliff wrote: July 11th, 2021, 3:00 pm This is a typical behavior in avian salmonellosis. Search in Google and you will see the symptoms one by one.
thanx Poliff :hi:
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Birdfriend
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Post by Birdfriend »

14:59 Jan again with water for three storklets. It is impossible for poor Benjamin to move his left wing, it looks as he is paralysed.
I will stopp to watch the next days. I cannot bear to see how he must suffer and finally starving to death.

Solo wrote:
Liz01 wrote: ↑July 11th, 2021, 7:05 am
19:31 on July 10! Benjamin is not begging for food. He is sitting in the nest ...https://youtu.be/C5urUThZXxs
At that time our Benjamin was still so strong, he had grabbed the fish, but it was to big...Jan took it back again.
One from the bigger siblings was not interested and finally was lying down. :nod:

You are right, it was not Benjamin.
The nature needs us not, but we need the nature
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Bibibu
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Post by Bibibu »

Solo wrote: July 11th, 2021, 3:02 pm it is Benjamin, my answer is to this video by Liz (Benjamin begged, fight bravely and ate -all day little one seemed to me O.K.):
yes you are right and then all of a sudden out of nowhere he tipped backwards while he was cleaning himself and everything is different.
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